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  • The International Concrete Abstracts Portal is an ACI led collaboration with leading technical organizations from within the international concrete industry and offers the most comprehensive collection of published concrete abstracts.

International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 15 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP127-10

Date: 

October 1, 1991

Author(s):

Murat Saatcioglu

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

127

Abstract:

Deformation capacity of reinforced concrete columns is investigated by examining the available test data. Tests of square columns, conducted under constant axial load and lateral displacement reversals, as well as those conducted under concentric compression, are considered. The test data are evaluated in terms of ductility and drift ratios. The results indicate that high axial compression, and high shear stress reversals, as well as high rates of loading, reduce column deformability. Confinement of core concrete improves column deformability significantly. This is achieved through the use of closely spaced transverse and longitudinal reinforcement, where the longitudinal reinforcement is laterally supported by closed hoops and crossties. The confinement action also improves with the volumetric ratio and yield strength of transverse reinforcement. The ACI 318-89 requirements for the amount of confinement reinforcement appear to be adequate for the columns evaluated in this paper.

DOI:

10.14359/3022


Document: 

SP127-13

Date: 

October 1, 1991

Author(s):

Mark Fintel and S. K. Ghosh

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

127

Abstract:

An alternative to the empirical code approach for earthquake-resistant design of building structures is proposed. The suggested procedure uses carefully selected earthquake accelerograms as loading and dynamic inelastic response history analysis to determine member forces and deformations. A number of analyses make it possible to design into the structural elements a desirable balance between flexural strength, shear capacity, and ductility. The amount of allowable ductility in a yielding member depends on selected serviceability criteria and on the deformational capacity of the member. The design approach makes it possible to predetermine the sequence in which inelasticity spreads to various designated structural members. A structure needs to be provided with special ductility details only in the predetermined hinging regions.

DOI:

10.14359/3028


Document: 

SP127-14

Date: 

October 1, 1991

Author(s):

James Robert Harris and Gene R. Stevens

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

127

Abstract:

Current building standards contain complex sets of rules for detailing reinforced concrete structures to resist earthquakes. The rules are intended to deliver reliable post-elastic energy dissipation. This is necessary because structures are designed to yield at levels of motion that are only a fraction of the real motions in a strong earthquake. The detailing rules are intended to prevent brittle modes of failure, such as shear and unconfined compression of concrete, while encouraging widespread flexural yielding. The rules also take into account two other distinctive characteristics of earthquake loading reversal of direction and repetitive cycles. This paper attempts to set forth the rationale for these detailing rules that will allow the designer to see the overall design philosophy and to relate a particular design to the intended performance.

DOI:

10.14359/3029


Document: 

SP127-04

Date: 

October 1, 1991

Author(s):

Daniel P. Abrams

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

127

Abstract:

This chapter serves as a primer to acquaint a novice with the vast amount of experimental data that has been acquired over the last two decades on behavior of reinforced concrete components subjected to repeated reversals of lateral force and earthquake response of concrete building systems. General characteristics of hysteretic behavior and dynamic response are presented rather than discrete summaries of each test program done to date. An extensive reference list presents over 400 publications that specifically address laboratory studies of reinforced concrete members, joints, or building systems. The listing is subdivided for laboratory investigations of (a) beams and beam-column joints, (b) columns, (c) walls, (d) frame and frame-wall systems, (e) coupled-wall systems, and (f) infilled-frame systems.

DOI:

10.14359/3009


Document: 

SP127-06

Date: 

October 1, 1991

Author(s):

Christian Meyer

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

127

Abstract:

The analysis of the response of building structures to dynamic loads is a difficult task, especially if the response is nonlinear, as in the case of concrete buildings subjected to strong seismic ground shaking. This is one of the most difficult tasks facing the structural engineer. The methods available for linear elastic analysis are summarized briefly, together with comments on the development of proper mathematical models for such analysis. A discussion of the main techniques suitable for the inelastic analysis of concrete buildings follows, again accompanied by practical guidelines for mathematical modeling for such analyses. The last section provides a list of several computer programs for engineers contemplating inelastic analyses of concrete buildings.

DOI:

10.14359/3014


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