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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 12 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP112

Date: 

January 1, 1989

Author(s):

Editor: H.S. Lew

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

112

Abstract:

SP112 Nondestructive Testing of Concrete has been especially prepared to present, examine, and promote the use of nondestructive testing techniques in concrete construction. Providing the latest information on the development and applications of nondestructive testing techniques, this collection of 11 papers will be of interest to anyone working in the field of concrete.

DOI:

10.14359/14145


Document: 

SP112-01

Date: 

January 1, 1989

Author(s):

M. Sansalone and N. J. Carino

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

112

Abstract:

A nondestructive test method has been developed for locating defects in concrete. The technique is referred to as the impact-echo method and is based on monitoring surface displacements resulting from the interactions of transient stress waves with internal discontinuities. Paper describes the technique and presents results of laboratory studies designed to evaluate the capabilities of the method. These laboratory studies were carried out on 500 mm thick slabs that contained a variety of artificial flaws embedded at known locations. Frequency analysis of recorded time-domain waveforms is explained and shown to be a quick and simple signal processing technique. Finally, results are presented from a field study in which the impact-echo method was used to investigate a 150 mm thick slab believed to contain voids.

DOI:

10.14359/3688


Document: 

SP112-04

Date: 

January 1, 1989

Author(s):

M. Ohtsu

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

112

Abstract:

On the basis of the acoustic emission (AE) measuring technique, a diagnostic method for nondestructive evaluation of cracks in concrete is proposed. The diagnostics consist of a mechanical criterion of crack initiation, a quantitative waveform analysis of AE, the evaluation of deterioration by a test of core specimens, and the ultrasonic spectroscopic investigation of cracked members. Results of basic studies on these methods are summarized. Results of basic studies confirm the feasibility and the usefulness of the proposed method as diagnostics of cracks in concrete structures.

DOI:

10.14359/2840


Document: 

SP112-09

Date: 

January 1, 1989

Author(s):

C. J. Turkstra, P. Zoltanetzky, Jr., H. P. Lim, and C. Gordon

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

112

Abstract:

Presents a comparison of 28 day concrete strength as measured by field probe penetration tests and standard laboratory cylinders. Over a period of 11 months, 318 matched sets of tests were performed on 4000-psi concrete at four major projects. Primary field variables include the project location, operators, test guns, and the element type on which the field tests were made. Corrections to account for temperature variations are considered. Results include statistical analysis of the effects of test parameters and the correlation between field and laboratory results. Based on standard statistical tests, it is concluded that the variability of field probe results is similar to that of the corresponding laboratory cylinder tests. Results did not depend significantly on operators or the particular equipment used. However, results did depend significantly on the type of structural element tested and on the range setting of the firing gun. It is concluded that the calibration charts provided with the equipment should be reviewed.

DOI:

10.14359/3736


Document: 

SP112-10

Date: 

January 1, 1989

Author(s):

T. J. Parson

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

112

Abstract:

Reports results of an investigation into the use of maturity for predicting early-age concrete strengths. Prediction models were developed from cylinder-test results obtained from twelve concrete mixtures cured under three constant curing conditions. A datum temperature of 25 F (-4 C) was used as it appeared to produce the best results. A prediction model based on estimated ultimate concrete strength was used and found to be independent of curing temperature. However, the estimated ultimate concrete strength value appeared to be dependent on curing temperature. The model was verified by using it to predict concrete strengths obtained from cylinders and slabs cured outdoors.

DOI:

10.14359/2372


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