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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 12 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP112-10

Date: 

January 1, 1989

Author(s):

T. J. Parson

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

112

Abstract:

Reports results of an investigation into the use of maturity for predicting early-age concrete strengths. Prediction models were developed from cylinder-test results obtained from twelve concrete mixtures cured under three constant curing conditions. A datum temperature of 25 F (-4 C) was used as it appeared to produce the best results. A prediction model based on estimated ultimate concrete strength was used and found to be independent of curing temperature. However, the estimated ultimate concrete strength value appeared to be dependent on curing temperature. The model was verified by using it to predict concrete strengths obtained from cylinders and slabs cured outdoors.

DOI:

10.14359/2372


Document: 

SP112-04

Date: 

January 1, 1989

Author(s):

M. Ohtsu

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

112

Abstract:

On the basis of the acoustic emission (AE) measuring technique, a diagnostic method for nondestructive evaluation of cracks in concrete is proposed. The diagnostics consist of a mechanical criterion of crack initiation, a quantitative waveform analysis of AE, the evaluation of deterioration by a test of core specimens, and the ultrasonic spectroscopic investigation of cracked members. Results of basic studies on these methods are summarized. Results of basic studies confirm the feasibility and the usefulness of the proposed method as diagnostics of cracks in concrete structures.

DOI:

10.14359/2840


Document: 

SP112-06

Date: 

January 1, 1989

Author(s):

C. H. Yun, K. R. Choi, S. Y. Kim, and Y. C. Song

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

112

Abstract:

Presents an investigation to determine the within-test variability of various nondestructive test methods (NDT) and the correlation between NDT test results and the corresponding compressive strength of cores. The size effects of coarse aggregate on the variability and correlation were also evaluated. The NDT test methods evaluated in the test series include rebound hammer, pulse velocity, probe penetration, pullout, and CAPO (cut and pullout). Companion tests of field-cured standard cylinders and cores were also made at the ages when the NDT tests were made. Results show that the within-test variability of the in situ tests reported (except the pulse velocity test) is two to five times higher than that of the corresponding standard compression test and is affected significantly by the amount of coarse aggregate and its size. There is a good relationship between the results of in situ tests and the compressive strength. In general, the highest degree of correlation is for the pullout test followed by that for the CAPO (cut and pullout) test and rebound test, probe penetration test, and pulse velocity test.

DOI:

10.14359/3706


Document: 

SP112-11

Date: 

January 1, 1989

Author(s):

R. L. Dilly and W. L. Vogt

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

112

Abstract:

Pullout testing and maturity have practical construction applications. Maturity is used to determine curing duration. The pullout test is used to determine in-place strength and to verify the adequacy of cure. Personal computers with spreadsheet software are tools that can benefit concrete construction. Templates developed using spreadsheet software can be used to acquire and analyze relationships between in-place strength and compressive strength, and maturity. Experimental investigations using pullout testing and maturity were undertaken and are reported using graphic features of spreadsheet software. The results of these experimental investigations show that curing environment can affect in-place strength relationships. Also, the results show that top to bottom strength differences can exist and should be considered when determining in-place strength. The results obtained using the compressible disk pullout assemblies indicate that this test method can be used to determine in-place strength without formwork removal, and the method should be further researched.

DOI:

10.14359/3742


Document: 

SP112-02

Date: 

January 1, 1989

Author(s):

A. Alexander and H. T. Thornton

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

112

Abstract:

A new improved prototype ultrasonic pitch-catch (two-transducer) and pulse echo (one-transducer) system has been developed for concrete. Signal generation and detection is done with piezoelectric crystals. A literature search revealed that no piezoelectric pulse-echo system had been developed for the ultrasonic range ( > 20 kHz) and that pitch-catch measurements needed further development. No commercial system could be found on the market for making pitch-catch measurements. Research by the U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station has resulted in the development of a 200-kHz pitch-catch system with a signal-to-noise ratio of 18 and a pulse-echo system with a SNR of 8. The mass and dimensions of the improved system have been reduced significantly from the prior state-of-the-art system. The WES system works well for thickness measurements of portland-cement concrete pavement and can indicate the presence of voids.

DOI:

10.14359/3655


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