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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 12 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP108

Date: 

August 1, 1988

Author(s):

Editors: David Whiting and Arthur Walitt

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

108

Abstract:

SP108 Designing and building long-lasting concrete structures requires the utilization of state-of-the-art technology. Concrete technologists throughout the world are becoming increasingly aware of the importance of permeability with regard to the ultimate longevity of concrete structures. New materials for reducing permeability and techniques for its measurement are rapidly being developed. Permeability of Concrete, a collection of eleven papers, will give you the knowledge you need to build durable concrete structures.

DOI:

10.14359/14141


Document: 

SP108-09

Date: 

August 1, 1988

Author(s):

B. R. Sullivan

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

108

Abstract:

A testing system which can accommodate up to seven samples simultaneously with computer-controlled data acquisition, analysis, and reporting is described. The system consists of seven core holders of the Hassler type which can handle cylindrical samples ranging from 1-1/2 to 4 in. in diameter and from 4 to 11 in. in length. Confining and driving pressures can be independently varied up to 4000 psi. The test medium can be either liquid or gas including brine, since all tubing and containers are stainless steel. Flow is determined by pressure increase in a collector tank for gas and change in liquid level in a pipette column for liquid. Four pressure transducers per core holder are used to monitor all pressure levels during a test. A computer-based data acquisition system is used to scan up to seven tests simultaneously and record all data on a disc. Upon termination of a test, flow and permeability are computed and plotted against time and a report is printed for the test. The data are saved permanently on the disk and a backup copy is transferred to a floppy disk for safe storage. Sample preparation, sealing, and testing procedures are explained. Data analysis and typical results are presented on salt cores and concrete samples.

DOI:

10.14359/3660


Document: 

SP108-02

Date: 

August 1, 1988

Author(s):

S. L. Marusin

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

108

Abstract:

This paper summarizes the results of permeability studies that have been undertaken since 1979. The research used a test procedure developed during the NCHRP Project 12-19A, "Concrete Sealers for Protection of Bridge Structures", which was reprinted in 1981 as NCHRP Report No. 244. This test method utilizes 10 cm concrete cubes, and chloride ion penetration is determined at 4 depths after 21 days exposure to 15 percent NaCl solution. The test results show that lowering of water-cement ratio in portland cement concrete or presence of superplasticizers, polymer admixtures, and silica fumes are able to significantly reduce concrete permeability.

DOI:

10.14359/2147


Document: 

SP108-04

Date: 

August 1, 1988

Author(s):

D. Perraton, P.C. Aiticin, and D. Vezina

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

108

Abstract:

Water, chloride-ion, and air permeability of two series of silica fume and non-silica fume concretes having water-cementitious ratios of 0.4 and 0.5 were studied as well as that of a 0.24 water-cementitious ratio silica fume concrete. Silica fume dosage varied from 5 to 20 percent by weight of cement. The water permeability of concrete samples having water-cementitious ratios lower than 0.5 is so low that they can be considered impervious whether they contain silica fume or not. The chloride-ion impermeability provided by silica fume rivals that of latex for water-cementitious ratios of 0.4 to 0.5 and polymer-impregnated concrete with a 0.24 w/c ratio. The two drying methods used in this research yielded a positive correlation between silica fume dosage and air permeability. Equal variations were observed for values of up to 10 percent, whereas at twenty percent, the increase was markedly sharper. The characterization of concrete permeability is not as simple as it appears. Sample preparation and fluid type can significantly affect the interpretation of the effect of an admixture such as silica fume.

DOI:

10.14359/2167


Document: 

SP108-08

Date: 

August 1, 1988

Author(s):

D. J. Janssen

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

108

Abstract:

Equipment and procedures for measuring actual permeability of portland cement concrete are presented. The equipment is built from readily available parts and materials and requires only standard laboratory air pressure and vacuum sources. The sample size used is 3 in. (7.5 cm) diameter x 3-1/8 in. (8 cm) long, but other sample sizes could be used. Typical measurements are presented to show repeatability and time required for permeability testing. The equipment has been used for permeabilities as low as 1 x 10-11 cm/sec. Concrete with lower permeability would require equipment modifications and/or longer measurement times.

DOI:

10.14359/3633


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