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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 13 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP107-01

Date: 

June 1, 1988

Author(s):

W. R. Anthony

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

107

Abstract:

This text moves from a macro view of the entire building process toward a micro view of the specific details, in an effort to maximize the value of a site-cast concrete building frame. It starts with an economic overview of the development process, including a budget analysis of a concrete framed building. A case is made for three basic principles that lead to constructability, allowing for efficiency during the construction of a site-cast concrete building from a formwork perspective. The text focuses on both horizontal and vertical design strategies, then attempts to integrate these concepts into a total project strategy using a 10-step approach. This paper stresses the need for teamwork. Teamwork is the key to achieving economy in the construction process, and good communications among all parties facilitates the team effort. The text is the product of a collaborative effort by the concrete construction division of a corporation. Their findings and recommendations were organized and integrated by the author. Additional resources are noted at the end of the article.

DOI:

10.14359/3339


Document: 

SP107-07

Date: 

June 1, 1988

Author(s):

C. H. Murphree

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

107

Abstract:

Forming economical concrete is discussed from the contractor's viewpoint. Two major concrete projects are used to compare manufactured and job-built systems for economy and quality. The contractor reveals his estimated and actual prices. The re-use of form panels, up to 72 times, produces real economy and achieves quality. The "team approach" in selecting the right system is used and recommended.

DOI:

10.14359/3635


Document: 

SP107-05

Date: 

June 1, 1988

Author(s):

W. R. Carr

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

107

Abstract:

This building indicates what can be accomplished when the developer, architect, engineer, and contractor work as a team to determine the most economical frame cost for a project. The shape of this office building was of primary importance to the architect and owner, but it penalized steel construction. The team's willingness to pursue framing methods not usually utilized in Michigan lead to the acceptance of a concrete frame. Other projects have undoubtedly been constructed in steel when concrete would have been a more economical alternative. If contractors are to fulfill their commitment to owners, they must be aware of market conditions and market changes. The best system for the last project may not be best for the next. Awareness of new construction methods--and a willingness to utilize them when appropriate--is an important feature for general contractors to contribute to the building team.

DOI:

10.14359/3360


Document: 

SP107-12

Date: 

June 1, 1988

Author(s):

M. Linetsky

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

107

Abstract:

Presents design and applications of machinery for on-site manufacture and erection of concrete wall panels and roof slabs to create single-story buildings. The precast components are produced and erected with trailer-mounted rotatable and lifting forms. The basic plant requires two or more technological cycles to erect a bay, while a modified version can build a single-room bay in one cycle. Sizes of the bays and design of the structures are intended to meet housing requirements in developing and industrialized countries. Due to the simplicity of the design, high productivity of the machinery and diversity of the product, the suggested forming system can be an effective craneless method of precast concrete construction.

DOI:

10.14359/3386


Document: 

SP107-03

Date: 

June 1, 1988

Author(s):

J. Zimmerman

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

107

Abstract:

Air-supported forming represents a rapid and cost-effective technique for building long span, thin shell, monolithic concrete structures. This construction method consists of inflating an air form, designed to the required building size and shape, after attachment to a foundation ring. Once inflated, the inside skin of the air form is sprayed with polyurethane foam. Steel reinforcement is fastened to the inside surface of the foam. Concrete is sprayed over the steel reinforcement, again from the inside. Steel is not placed, and concrete is not sprayed where shell openings are required. The air form can be color-coated and textured, or removed for reuse when protective coatings are applied over the exposed foam. This technology is appropriate for free-span architectural applications, bulk storage of granulated solids, and liquids.

DOI:

10.14359/3346


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