The MODIFIED COMPRESSION FIELD THEORY: THEN AND NOW

ABOUT THE INTERNATIONAL CONCRETE ABSTRACTS PORTAL

  • The International Concrete Abstracts Portal is an ACI led collaboration with leading technical organizations from within the international concrete industry and offers the most comprehensive collection of published concrete abstracts.

International Concrete Abstracts Portal

  


Title: The MODIFIED COMPRESSION FIELD THEORY: THEN AND NOW

Author(s): Vahid Sadeghian and Frank Vecchio

Publication: Special Publication

Volume: 328

Issue:

Appears on pages(s):

Keywords: nonlinear analysis; reinforced concrete; shear behavior

Date: 9/12/2018

Abstract:
The Modified Compression Field Theory (MCFT) was introduced almost 40 years ago as a simple and effective model for calculating the response of reinforced concrete elements under general loading conditions with particular focus on shear. The model was based on a smeared rotating crack concept, and treated cracked reinforced concrete as a new orthotropic material with unique constitutive relationships. An extension of MCFT, known as the Disturbed Stress Field Model (DSFM), was later developed which removed some restrictions and increased the accuracy of the method. The MCFT has been adapted to various types of finite element analysis programs as well as structural design codes. In recent years, the application of the method has been extended to more advanced research areas including extreme loading conditions, stochastic analysis, fiber-reinforced concrete, repaired structures, multi-scale analysis, and hybrid simulation. This paper presents a brief overview of the original formulation and its evolvement over the last three decades. In addition, the adaptation of the method to advanced research areas are discussed. It is concluded that the MCFT remains a viable and effective model, whose value lies in its simple yet versatile formulation which enables it to serve as a foundation for accurately solving many diverse and complex problems pertaining to reinforced concrete structures.