Strength Development and Temperature Rise in High-Volume Fly Ash and Slag Concretes in Large Experimental Monoliths

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Title: Strength Development and Temperature Rise in High-Volume Fly Ash and Slag Concretes in Large Experimental Monoliths

Author(s): M. Rivest, N. Bouzoubaa, and V. M. Malhotra

Publication: Special Publication

Volume: 221

Issue:

Appears on pages(s): 859-878

Keywords: compressive strength; de-icing salt scaling resistance; freezing and thawing; high-volume fly ash concrete; high-volume slag concrete; superplastizer; Young's modulus of elasticity

Date: 5/1/2004

Abstract:
Four rectangular concrete monoliths, each 2.5x4.Ox5.0-m high, were cast in Laval, Quebec in 1989. TWo control monoliths No. 1 and 2 were cast with concrete made with AST M Type I cement and with a modified version of ASTM Type 11 cement, respectively. Test monoliths No. 3 and 4 were cast using superplasticized high-volume fly ash concrete incorporating 56% fly ash as replacement for cement and high-volume slag concrete incorporating 60% granulated blast furnace slag as cement replacement. All monoliths were instrumented with thermocouples to monitor temperature rise. A large number of specimens were cast from concrete for each monolith for testing compressive, flexural, and splitting-tensile strengths, drying shrinkage, Young's modulus of elasticity, freezing and thawing and de-icing salt scaling resistance. The results show that the adequate strength development and low temperature rise characteristics of high-volume fly ash concrete, combined with the ability to place the concrete in one 5-m continuous lift, make this type of material very attractive for mass concrete applications. On the other hand, the significant high temperature rise and high later-age strength of high-volume slag concrete make this type of concrete more attractive for structural applications but not for mass concrete applications.