SP-017(11): The Reinforced Concrete Design Manual Volume 1

SP-017(11): The Reinforced Concrete Design Manual Volume 1

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This manual is published in two volumes. Volume 1 includes design and analysis for columns, flexure, footings, seismic, shear, and two new chapters on deflection and strut-and-tie in accordance with ACI 318-11. Information is presented in three sections: Explanatory Material, Design Examples, and Design Aids. The Introduction of each chapter includes explanatory material that provides the engineer with concise background of the subject. The Design Examples illustrate the use of the Design Aids, which are tables and graphs intended to eliminate routine and repetitious calculations. Volume 2 (available separately) includes design and analysis for anchorage to concrete.

 

Document Details

Publication Year: 2017

Pages: 338.00

ISBN: 9780870319228

Categories: Design

Formats: PDF or Protected PDF/Web View

Table of Contents

THE REINFORCED CONCRETE DESIGN MANUAL

in Accordance with ACI 318-11

Volume 1

Editors: Ronald Janowiak, Michael Kreger, and Antonio Nanni

ACI SP-17(11)1

CONTENTS

Chapter 1—Design for flexure

1.1—Introduction.

1.2—Nominal and design flexural strengths (Mn and ΦMn) .

1.2.1—Rectangular sections with tension reinforcement

1.2.2—Rectangular sections with compression reinforcement

1.2.3—T-sections

1.3—Minimum flexural reinforcement

1.4—Placement of reinforcement in sections

1.4.1—Minimum spacing of longitudinal reinforcement

1.4.2—Concrete protection for reinforcement

1.4.3—Maximum spacing of flexural reinforcement and crack control

1.4.4—Skin reinforcement

1.5—Flexure examples

Flexure Example 1: Calculation of tension reinforcement area for a rectangular tension-controlled cross section

Flexure Example 2: Calculation of nominal flexural strength of a rectangular beam subjected to positive bending

Flexure Example 3: Calculation of tension reinforcement area for a rectangular cross section in the transition zone

Flexure Example 4: Selection of slab thickness and area of flexural reinforcement

Flexure Example 5: Calculation of tension and compression reinforcement area for a rectangular beam section subjected to positive bending

Flexure Example 6: Calculation of tension reinforcement area for a T-section subjected to positive

bending, behaving as a rectangular section

Flexure Example 7: Computation of the tension reinforcement area for a T-section, subjected to positive

bending, behaving as a tension-controlled T-section

Flexure Example 8: Calculation of the area of tension reinforcement for an L-beam section,subjected to positive bending behaving as an L-section in the transition zone

Flexure Example 9: Placement of reinforcement in the rectangular beam section designed in Flexure Example 1

Flexure Example 10: Placement of reinforcement in the slab section designed in Flexure Example 4

1.6—Flexure design aids

Flexure 1: Flexural coefficients for rectangular beams with tension reinforcement; fy = 60,000 psi

Flexure 2: Flexural coefficients for rectangular beams with tension reinforcement; fy = 60,000 psi

Flexure 3: Flexural coefficients for rectangular beams with tension reinforcement; fy = 75,000 psi

Flexure 4: Flexural coefficients for rectangular beams with tension reinforcement; fy = 75,000 psi

Flexure 5: Reinforcement ratio p′for compression reinforcement

Flexure 6: T-beam construction and definition of effective flange width

Flexure 7: Reinforcement ratio pf (%) balancing concrete in overhang(s) in T- or L-beams; fy = 60,000 psi

Flexure 8: Reinforcement ratio pf (%) balancing concrete in overhang(s) in T- or L-beams; fy = 75,000 psi

Flexure 9: Bar spacing and cover requirements

Flexure 10: Skin reinforcement

Chapter 2—Design for shear

2.1—Introduction

2.2—Shear strength of beams

2.3—Designing shear reinforcement for beams

2.4—Shear strength of two-way slabs

2.5—Shear strength with torsion and flexure

2.6—Shear design examples.

Shear Example 1: Determine stirrups required for simply supported beam.

Shear Example 2: Determine beam shear strength of concrete by method of Section 11.2.2.1

Shear Example 3: Vertical U-stirrups for beam with triangular shear diagram

Shear Example 4: Vertical U-stirrups for beam with trapezoidal and triangular shear diagram

Shear Example 5: Determination of perimeter shear strength at an interior column supporting a flat slab (αs = 40)

Shear Example 6: Determination of thickness required for perimeter shear strength of a flat slab at an interior rectangular column

Shear Example 7: Determination of perimeter shear strength at an interior rectangular column supporting a flat slab (βc > 4)

Shear Example 8: Determination of required thickness of a footing to satisfy perimeter shear strength at a rectangular column.

Shear Example 9: Determination of strength of a flat slab based on required perimeter shear strength at an interior round column

Shear Example 10: Determination of thickness required for a flat slab based on required perimeter shear strength at an interior round column

Shear Example 11: Determination of thickness of a square footing to satisfy perimeter shear strength

under a circular column

Shear Example 12: Determination of closed ties required for the beam shown to resist flexural shear and

determinate torque

Shear Example 13: Determination of closed ties required for the beam of Example 12 to resist flexural shear

and indeterminate torque

2.7—Shear design aids

Shear 1: Section limits based on required nominal shear stress = Vu/(Φbwd) .

Shear 2: Shear strength coefficients Kfc, Kvc, and Kvs 54

Shear 3: Minimum beam height to provide development length required for No. 6, No. 7, and No. 8

Grade 60 stirrups

Shear 4.1: Shear strength Vs with Grade 40 U-stirrups

Shear 4.2: Shear strength Vs with Grade 60 U-stirrups

Shear 5.1: Shear strength of slabs based on perimeter shear at interior rectangular columns (αs = 40)

when no shear reinforcement is used

Shear 5.2: Shear strength of slabs based on perimeter shear at interior round columns when no shear reinforcement is used

Shear 6.1: Shear and torsion coefficients Kt and Ktcr

Shear 6.2: Shear and torsion coefficient Kts

Chapter 3—Short column design

3.1—Introduction

3.2—Column sectional strength.

3.2.1—Column interaction diagrams

3.2.2—Flexure with tension axial load

3.3—Columns subjected to biaxial bending

3.3.1—Reciprocal load method

3.3.2—Load contour method

3.4—Columns examples

Columns Example 1: Determination of required steel area for a rectangular tied column with bars

on four faces with slenderness ratio below critical value .

Columns Example 2: For a specified reinforcement ratio, select a column size for a rectangular tied column with bars on end faces only

Columns Example 3: Selection of reinforcement for a square spiral column with slenderness ratio below critical value

Columns Example 4: Design of square column section subject to biaxial bending using resultant moment

Columns Example 5: Design of circular spiral column section subject to small design moment

3.5—Columns design aids

Chapter 4—Design of slender columns

4.1—Introduction

4.2—Slenderness ratio

4.2.1—Unsupported length lu

4.2.2—Effective length factor k

4.2.3—Radius of gyration r

4.3—Lateral bracing and designation of frames as nonsway .

4.4—Design of slender columns

4.4.1—Slender columns in nonsway frames

4.4.2—Slender columns in sway frames.

4.4.3—Upper limit on second-order effects

4.5—Slender columns examples

Slender Columns Example 1: Design of an interior column braced against sidesway

Slender Columns Example 2: Design of an exterior column in a sway frame using the moment magnification method

4.6—Slender columns design aids

Slender Columns 4.1: Effective length factor—Jackson and Moreland alignment chart for columns

in braced (nonsway) frames (Column Research Council 1966).

Slender Columns 4.2: Effective length factor—Jackson and Moreland alignment chart for columns

in unbraced (sway) frames (Column Research Council 1966)

Slender Columns 4.3: Recommended flexural rigidities (EI) for use in first-order and second-order analyses of frames for design of slender columns

Slender Columns 4.4: Effective length factor k for columns in braced frames

Slender Columns 4.5: Moment of inertia of reinforcement about sectional centroid

Chapter 5—Footing design

5.1—Introduction. 191

5.2—Foundation types

5.3—Allowable stress design and strength design

5.4—Structural design

5.5—Footings subject to eccentric loading

5.6—Footings examples

Footings Example 1: Design of a continuous (wall) footing

Footings Example 2: Design of a square spread footing

Footings Example 3: Design of a rectangular spread footing.

Footings Example 4: Design of a pile cap

Footings Example 5: Design of a continuous footing with an overturning moment

Chapter 6—Seismic design

6.1—Introduction

6.2—Limitations on materials

6.3—Flexural members of special moment frames

6.3.1—Flexural design

6.3.2—Shear design

6.4—Special moment frame members subjected to bending and axial load .

6.4.1—Flexural design

6.4.2—Strong-column weak-beam concept

6.4.3—Confinement reinforcement

6.4.4—Shear design

6.5—Joints of special moment frames

6.5.1—Joint shear strength

6.5.2—Joint reinforcement

6.6—Members of intermediate moment frames

6.6.1—Flexural design

6.6.2—Shear design

6.7—Members not designed as part of the lateral-force-resisting system.

6.8—Seismic design examples

Seismic Design Example 1: Adequacy of beam flexural design for a special moment frame

Seismic Design Example 2: Design of the critical end regions of a beam in a special moment frame for shear and confinement

Seismic Design Example 3: Design of a column of a special moment frame for longitudinal and confinement reinforcement

Seismic Design Example 4: Shear strength of a monolithic beam-column joint

6.9—Seismic design aids

Seismic 1: Requirements for flexural members of special moment frames

Seismic 2: Details of transverse reinforcement for flexural members of special moment frames

Seismic 3: Probable moment strength for flexural members

Seismic 4: Shear strength for flexural members and members subjected to bending and axial load of special moment frames.

Seismic 5: Requirements for members subjected to bending and axial load of special moment frames

Seismic 6: Volumetric ratio of spiral reinforcement ρs for concrete confinement

Seismic 7: Area ratio of rectilinear confinement reinforcement ρc for concrete

Seismic 8: Joint shear Vj in an interior beam-column joint.

Seismic 9: Joint shear Vj in an exterior beam-column joint

Seismic 10: Requirements for flexural members and members subjected to bending and axial load of intermediate moment frames

Seismic 11: Shear strength for flexural members and members subjected to bending and axial load of intermediate frames

Chapter 7—Deflection

7.1—Introduction

7.2—Limitations on member thickness

7.3—Deflection behavior of beams

7.4—Deflection examples

Deflection Example 1: Effective moment of inertia for a rectangular section with tension reinforcement

Deflection Example 2: Deflection of a simple span, rectangular beam with tension reinforcement .

Deflection Example 3: Moment of inertia of a cracked T-section with tension reinforcement

Deflection Example 4: Moment of inertia of a cracked section with tension and compression reinforcement

Deflection Example 5: Live-load deflection of a continuous beam .

Deflection Example 6: Effective moment of inertia of a rectangular beam with tension reinforcement

Deflection Example 7: Cracking moment for T-section

7.5—Deflection design aids

Deflection 7.1: Cracking moment Mcr for rectangular sections.

Deflection 7.2: Cracking moment Mcr for T- or L-sections with tension at the bottom (positive moment)

Deflection 7.3.1: Cracking moment Mcr for T- or L-sections with tension at the top (negative moment);

βh = 0.10, 0.15, and 0.20

Deflection 7.3.2: Cracking moment Mcr for T- or L-sections with tension at the top (negative moment);

βh = 0.25, 0.30, and 0.40

Deflection 7.4: Cracked section moment of inertia Icr for rectangular sections with tension reinforcement only

Deflection 7.5: Gross moment of inertia Ig for T-section

Deflection 7.6.1: Cracked-section moment of inertia Icr for rectangular sections with compression steel,

or T-sections (values of Ki2); for βc from 0.1 through 0.9

Deflection 7.6.2: Cracked-section moment of inertia Icr for rectangular sections with compression steel,

or T-sections (values of Ki2); for βc from 1.0 through 5.0

Deflection 7.7.1: Effective moment of inertia Ie (values of Ki3)

Deflection 7.7.2: Effective moment of inertia Ie for rectangular sections with tension reinforcement only

(values of Ki3)

Deflection 7.8.1: Coefficient Ka3 and typical Mc formulas for calculating immediate deflection of flexural members

Deflection 7.8.2: Coefficient Ka1 for calculating immediate deflection of flexural members.

Deflection 7.9: Creep and shrinkage deflection (additional long-time deflection) due to sustained loads

Deflection 7.10: Modulus of elasticity Ec for various concrete strengths

Chapter 8—Strut-and-tie model

8.1—Introduction.

8.2—Concept

8.3—Design

8.4—Struts

8.5—Ties

8.6—Nodal zones.

8.7—Usual calculation steps and modeling consideration to apply strut-and-tie model

8.8—References

8.9—Strut-and-tie examples

Strut-and-tie Example 1: Strut-and-tie model of a deep beam without shear reinforcement

Strut-and-tie Example 2: Strut-and-tie model of a deep beam with shear reinforcement

Strut-and-tie Example 3: Design of one-sided corbel using strut-and-tie method.

Strut-and-tie Example 4: Design of double corbel.

Strut-and-tie Example 5: Design a pile cap subjected to the dead and live load axial forces and to axial forces and overturning moment

References

Referenced standards and reports

Cited references

Appendix A—Reference tables

Table A-1: Nominal cross section area, weight, and nominal diameter of ASTM standard reinforcing bars

Table A-2: Area of bars in a section 1 ft wide

Table A-3: Minimum beam web widths required for two or more bars in one layer for cast-in-place non-prestressed concrete

Table A-4: Minimum beam web widths for various bar combinations (interior exposure)

Table A-5: Properties of bundled bars

Table A-6: Minimum beam web widths bw for various combinations of bundled bars (interior exposure)

Table A-7: Basic development length ratios of bars in tension

Table A-8: Basic development length ldh of standard hooks in tension

Appendix B—Analysis tables

Table B-1: Beam diagrams

Table B-2: Moments and reactions in continuous beams under uniformly distributed loads

Table B-3: Moments and reactions in continuous beams under central point loads.

Table B-4: Moments and reactions in continuous beams, point loads at third points of span

Table B-5: Approximate moments and shears for continuous beams and one-way slabs

Table B-6: Beams with prismatic haunch at one end

Table B-7: Beams with prismatic haunch at both ends

Table B-8: Prismatic member with equal infinitely stiff end regions

Table B-9: Prismatic member with infinitely stiff region at one end

Table B-10: Prismatic member with unequal infinitely stiff end regions

Appendix C—Sectional properties

Table C-1: Properties of sections

Table C-2: Properties of sections

ERRATA INFO

Any applicable errata are included with individual documents at the time of purchase. Errata are not included for collections or sets of documents such as the ACI Collection. For a listing of and access to all product errata, visit the Errata page.

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