Effect of Quarry Dust on The Physical Properties of High Performance Concrete

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Title: Effect of Quarry Dust on The Physical Properties of High Performance Concrete

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Publication: CIA

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Date: 2/13/2011

Abstract:
This paper present a report on the possibility of developing high performance concrete (HPC) using quarry dust as part of fine aggregates. Quarry dust was used to replace 20% of sand in silica fume-quarry dust (SFQD) and silica fume (SF) concretes. Besides, silica fume was used as 10% replacement of cement in both SF and SFQD concretes. SFQD and SF concretes were prepared with normal portland cement (NPC) concrete. Slump, slump-flow and V-funnel flow were measured to indicate the workability of the fresh composite. SFQD concrete fulfilled the workability requirement of HPC. The hardened test specimens were subjected to dry air and water curing. The aim was to identify the most efficient curing method to impart higher compressive strength, elasticity and durability. Tests for compressive strength, and initial surface absorption (ISA) were conducted on the hardened specimens. Test results reveal that water cured SFQD concrete has provided adequate compressive strength at the age of 28 and 91 days, which should be maintained in HPC. It was also observed that water cured SFQD concrete has provided lower ISA-values, although not the lowest, compared to SF concrete. These values are quite low compared to the maximum absorption of low absorptive concrete. Hence, this study reveals that HPC can be produced by the use of quarry dust as part of fine aggregates.


Concrete Institute of Australia, International Partner Access.

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