376-10: Code Requirements for Design and Construction of Concrete Structures for the Containment of Refrigerated Liquefied Gases and Commentary (An ACI Provisional Standard)

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Title: 376-10: Code Requirements for Design and Construction of Concrete Structures for the Containment of Refrigerated Liquefied Gases and Commentary (An ACI Provisional Standard)

Author(s):

Publication: Technical Documents

Volume:

Issue:

Appears on pages(s): 165

Keywords: bund wall; cool-down; liquefied natural gas (LNG); commissioning; decommissioning; cryogenic; damage stability; earthquake design levels (OBE, SSE, SSEaft, DLE and SLE); fatigue; impact loads; float out; floating storage unit (FSU).

Date: 2/1/2010

Abstract:

Note: A newer version of this document exists. This document was replaced by 376-11.

This Code and Commentary was prepared by ACI Committee 376. The formation of Committee 376 and the drafting of this document were undertaken in response to a request in February 2003 by the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Technical Committee 59A on liquefied natural gas (LNG). That Committee is responsible for NFPA 59A, which is an internationally recognized standard governing the production, storage, and handling of one particular refrigerated liquefied gas, LNG, at an operating temperature of –270 °F. NFPA 59A contains provisions for the use of reinforced concrete and prestressed concrete for two principal applications: impoundment (secondary containment in conjunction with a metallic primary container) and storage (primary containment). The references cited by NFPA 59A for the use of reinforced concrete/prestressed concrete for these applications are ACI 318, 372R, and 373R. However, the usefulness of these references to NFPA 59A is somewhat limited by the fact that none of these references provide guidelines specifically tailored to the use of concrete at cryogenic temperatures. This limitation was the impetus for the request by NFPA Committee 59A that ACI undertake the preparation of a standard to address this particular need. While the NFPA request was related specifically to the containment of LNG, it was decided that ACI Code and Commentary would address the use of concrete for other refrigerated liquids as well, ranging in operating temperatures from +40 to –270 °F. This makes the Code and Commentary analogous to the American Petroleum Institute’s API 620, which governs design and construction of steel and aluminum RLG storage tanks to –270 °F. The most common use of reinforced concrete and prestressed concrete in cryogenic storage applications is for secondary containment around metal primary storage tanks. Installations were built in North America and in Europe during the 1960s through 1980s with prestressed concrete primary containment. Renewed interest in the use of concrete for primary containment and the need for a code that addressed secondary concrete containment led to the development of this Code.