Freeze-Thaw Durability of Concrete Coated With Linseed Oil

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Title: Freeze-Thaw Durability of Concrete Coated With Linseed Oil

Author(s): Tel Rezansoff and Dan Stott

Publication: Special Publication

Volume: 122

Issue:

Appears on pages(s): 61-80

Keywords: accelerating agents; air-entrained concretes; coatings; concrete durability; freeze-thaw durability; linseed oil; tests; Materials Research

Date: 6/1/1990

Abstract:
The relative durability of air-entrained concrete with and without boiled linseed oil coating was evaluated using the rapid freeze-thaw method of ASTM C 666, Procedure A, by measuring the reduction in dynamic modulus and weight loss of the test prisms. Surface scaling was also monitored visually. The richness of the mix was varied by using cement factors of 267 kg/m3 (450 lb/yd3) and 300 kg/m3 (506 lb/yd3). Freeze-thaw durability was reduced in some test prisms of the richer mix through the addition of a chloride-based setting and strength accelerator. Curing prior to freeze-thaw cycling was varied in the lean mix. Prisms were either water-cured for 2 weeks prior to coating with linseed oil before testing, or were coated with linseed oil after removal from molds at 24 hr and then cured under ambient low humidity before freeze-thaw testing at 2 weeks. Uncoated specimens that were water-cured for 2 weeks prior to freeze-thaw cycling served as the control. The use of undiluted linseed oil proved to be superior to using a 50 percent Varsol-50 percent boiled linseed oil mixture, contrary to what was expected. Mixes proved to be quite durable except for the mix in the third series, in which the chloride-based accelerator reduced the freeze-thaw resistance below acceptable limits. The use of a linseed oil coating provided some, though insufficient, improvement in the durability of this mix.