Incombustibility of Polymer Concretes Made With Wet Aggregates

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Title: Incombustibility of Polymer Concretes Made With Wet Aggregates

Author(s): Y. Ohama, M. Hamatsu

Publication: Special Publication

Volume: 99

Issue:

Appears on pages(s): 151-164

Keywords: aggregates; compressive strength; flammability; metal fibers; methyl methacrylate; polyester resins; polymer concrete; wetting; Materials Research

Date: 5/1/1987

Abstract:
Polymer concretes using various polymeric binders are widely used as building materials, but it is generally considered that their thermal resistance and fire resistance are limited because of the thermally unstable and combustible polymeric binders used. This paper deals with the incombustibility of polyester and polymethyl methacrylate concretes made with wet aggregates by applying strength improvement techniques, including the addition of moisture absorptive additives, a silane-coupling agent, and steel fibers. The polyester and polymethyl methacrylate concretes are prepared with wet aggregates, moisture absorptive additives, a silane-coupling agent, and steel fibers. First, the concretes are tested for compressive strength to examine the effects of the applied strength improvement techniques. Then they are tested for incombustibility by the surface burning test specified in JIS A 1321 (Testing Method for Incombustibility of Internal Finish Material and Procedure of Buildings). It is concluded from the test results that the use of wet aggregates causes great improvement in the incombustibility of polyester concrete, but polymethyl methacrylate concrete with wet aggregates does not provide a good incombustibility because of the thermal decomposition of its binder at a relatively low temperature.