Comparison Between the Reinforced Concrete Test Structure and Design Requirements from U.S. and Japanese Building Codes

ABOUT THE INTERNATIONAL CONCRETE ABSTRACTS PORTAL

  • The International Concrete Abstracts Portal is an ACI led collaboration with leading technical organizations from within the international concrete industry and offers the most comprehensive collection of published concrete abstracts.

International Concrete Abstracts Portal

  


Title: Comparison Between the Reinforced Concrete Test Structure and Design Requirements from U.S. and Japanese Building Codes

Author(s): J. Wight, V. Bertero, and H. Aoyama

Publication: Special Publication

Volume: 84

Issue:

Appears on pages(s): 73-104

Keywords: building codes; earthquake resistant structures; evaluation; multistory buildings; reinforced concrete; structural design.

Date: 10/1/1984

Abstract:
Analyses are made to indicate how member strengths and reinforcement details used in the full scale reinforced concrete test structure compared to appropriate design requirements of the 1979 Edition of the Uniform Building Code (1) and current Japanese Building Standard Law (2, 3) and Architectural Institute of Japan Standard (4) . Comparison between the test structure and the design requirements of the Uniform Building Code indicate that even though the test structure was intended to represent a dual bracing type of structure, certain minimum strength and reinforcement detailing requirements of the Code were not satisfied . However, the provided member strengths and reinforcement details were considered to be sufficient to provide the needed dissipation of energy (through stable hysteresis behavior) to survive major seismic excitations without excessive damage. This was considered possible due to the relatively low percentages of longitudinal steel that we reused in the test structure and thus, only low or moderate shear stresses should be developed due to flexural hinging. The structural members were smaller and the reinforcement ratios were less than those normally found in a Japanese building of this size . Member capacities were considerably below that required in Japan and the ultimate lateral load capacity was approximately 65 percent of the required value.