Design of Multistory Reinforced Concrete Buildings for Earthquake Motions

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Title: Design of Multistory Reinforced Concrete Buildings for Earthquake Motions

Author(s): John A. Blume, Nathan M. Newmark, and Leo H. Corning

Publication: Concrete International

Volume: 26

Issue: 12

Appears on pages(s): 71-78

Keywords:

Date: 12/1/2004

Abstract:
Considerable knowledge has been gained in the last three decades about the phenomena of ground motion, the characteristics of structures, and their behavior in earthquakes. In addition, much has been learned about the response of various vibrating systems to such motion. Despite this progress and coincidental development of earthquake design criteria and codes, the unknowns and the complexities are still so great that earthquake-resistant design is not yet capable of complete and rigorous execution solely by means of mathematical analysis, design codes, specifications, or rules of procedure. It is an art as well as a science, and requires experience and judgment on the part of the engineer, as well as sensitivity co the true nature of the problem including the behavior of materials and structures subject to various types and degrees of motion. Above all it is necessary to have an understanding of the manner in which a structure absorbs the energy transmitted to it by an earthquake and the maximum amount of motion or energy the structure can sustain. It is intended that this manual will furnish current information pertaining to these topics and specifically to the earthquake-resistant design of multistory reinforced concrete buildings. The authors and the Portland Cement Association emphasize, however, that neither this manual nor any earthquake code, spectral analysis, or other procedure can supplant the sound professional judgment of engineers familiar with the earthquake problem.