Effect of Water and Steam Curing on Long-Term Performance of Concrete

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Title: Effect of Water and Steam Curing on Long-Term Performance of Concrete

Author(s): V. Sirivivatnanon, S. L. Mak, and N. Gowripalan

Publication: Special Publication

Volume: 221

Issue:

Appears on pages(s): 821-836

Keywords: carbonation; chloride-ion penetration; creep; curing; hydration; oxygen permeability; porosity; supplementary cementing materials (SCM)

Date: 5/1/2004

Abstract:
There has always been a demand for curing of concrete in specifications. Curing can be defined from the material science and engineering viewpoint. It may be difficult for the workers and contractors to comply with curing specifications especially if the benefit of curing is not measurable or when unrealistic curing regime is demanded. The influence of curing on the resistance of concrete to carbonation has been examined and reported since the early 1990's. The influence of a range of curing membranes on surface porosity and the degrees of hydration of cement has also been investigated by Gowripalan et al. (3) and is reemphasised in this paper. More recently, significant re-search has been undertaken to study the effectiveness of various practical curing regimes on the long-term properties of high performance concrete. In addition, the sensitiveness of properties of concrete, made from various binder systems, to curing has also been examined. In particular, the effect of three curing regimes: 7-day sealed, 7-day wet and a simulated steam curing, on the chloride penetration resistance and long-tern volume stability of GP-cement and Slag-cement concrete is reported. From these studies, the need for curing is critically examined from the cost-benefit consideration given that end performance depends on both the type of concrete used and the associated curing regime. An approach to specification based on current knowledge is discussed.