Long-Time Study of Cement Performance in Concrete Chapter 11 - Report on the Condition of Three Test Pavements After 15 Years of Service

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Title: Long-Time Study of Cement Performance in Concrete Chapter 11 - Report on the Condition of Three Test Pavements After 15 Years of Service

Author(s): Frank H. Jackson

Publication: Journal Proceedings

Volume: 54

Issue: 6

Appears on pages(s): 1017-1032

Keywords: no keywords

Date: 6/1/1958

Abstract:
This report discusses the present condition of three test pavements built about 15 years ago. One pavement is in western New York in a region subject to severe natural weathering, one in central Missouri where exposure condi-tions are moderately severe, and one in western South Carolina where mild weather prevails. Twenty-seven cements, differing widely in their chemiral and physical properties, were used in these pavements. After 15 years service the New York pavement exhibits surface scaling in varying amounts on almost all sections containing the non-air-entraining cements. However, escept for the Type IV and Type V cements, there is no indication that any one non-air-entraining cement or type of non-air-entraining cement is more resistant to scaling than another. Type IV and Type V cements show greater average resistance to scaling than the other non-air-entraining types. All sections containing air-entraining cements arc still completely free from surface scale. Aside from some light scale or surface wear on the South Carolina project and some D-cracking on the Missouri road, neither of which can be associated in any way with a particular cement or cement. type, all of the cements have performed equally well on both projects. Under the conditions prevailing on these projects, variations in the chemical composition and fineness of the ce-ment, within the limits represented by this study, appear to be without significance insofar as resistance to freezing and thawing is concerned.