Properties of High-Strength Concrete Incorporating Very Finely Ground Granulated Blast Furnace Slag

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Title: Properties of High-Strength Concrete Incorporating Very Finely Ground Granulated Blast Furnace Slag

Author(s): Nobuyuki Nakamura, Masami Sakai, Kiyoshi Koibuchi, and Yasushi Iijima

Publication: Special Publication

Volume: 91

Issue:

Appears on pages(s): 1361-1380

Keywords: blast furnace slag; chlorides; compressive strength; freeze-thaw durability; high-strength concretes; permeability; silica.

Date: 2/1/1986

Abstract:
This paper describes how some properties of high compressive- strength concrete (60 -8OMPa) can be improved by the use of very fine ground granulated blast-furnace slag as a partial replacement fqr portland cement. The fineness of very fine ground slag is 715 m/k g 2 (Blaine) made from classifying ordinary ground slag (364 m /kg Blaine) by the air separator. Concrete mixtures containing very fine ground slag were tested varying the substitution ratio of slag to total content of cementitious materials (slag + portland cement) 10, 40,3 and 70 percent. The total cementitious materials were 500 kg/m and 400 kg/m and the water-cement ratios (W/C) were 0.30 and 0.325 respectively. Concrete mixtures containing other materials, such as ordinary ground slag and silica fume, were also tested. The properties of the concrete investigated were compressive strength (at the ages of 7, 28, 56, and 91 days), resistance to freezing and thawing, permeability, and resistance to chloride penetration. A comparison of these properties was made between very fine ground slag and other materials similarly used. It was found that high compressive strength could be obtained with the improvement of permeability, resistance to chloride penetration, and other properties, even if very fine ground slag was substituted for cement at a replacement level of 70 %.