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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 65 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP326-97

Date: 

August 10, 2018

Author(s):

Lyudmila Elshina, Vyacheslav Yarmakovskiy, Igor Kirillov, and Vladimir Panteleev

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

326

Abstract:

Since 2014 the Research Institute of Concrete and Reinforced Concrete, named after A. Gvozdev of Research Center "Construction", provides scientific and technical support of construction of unique transport hub facilities and a Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) plant with a capacity of 36,376.3 million pounds [16,5 million tons] per year on the source of the South Tambey field in the Yamal-Nenets National District.

The Institute has developed recipes for concrete of liquefied gas tank and underground structures, has controlled over the reinforcement, casting and care during the hardening of concrete structures. The newest equipment for the production, transportation and concreting of common and prestressed structures were implemented. Hypothetical leak of LNG from the reinforced tanks can result into unacceptable consequences. Due to complex interaction of the harsh climate conditions, intrinsic unstable geotechnical base and vulnerability of Arctic environment can escalate into cascade accident. In order to eliminate the major accidents or to minimize the consequences within the acceptable margins a multi-tier safety framework should be administrated and placed. The key findings from accumulated scientific and engineering experience are described as the practice-oriented cases.


Document: 

SP326-50

Date: 

August 10, 2018

Author(s):

Shaojun Zhou, Takumi Nishiwaki, Yuko Ogawa, and Kenji Kawai

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

326

Abstract:

Reduction of municipal wastes is important, and one of the probable solutions is to utilize by-products and wastes such as blast furnace slag and incinerated ash in eco-concrete. However, municipal wastes may contain heavy metals, and it is well known that heavy metal ions can be easily adsorbed on cement hydrates. On the other hand, it is also found that adsorbed heavy metal ions can be easily leached in the presence of calcium chloride. In the present study, the leaching behavior of heavy metal ions from mortar specimens immersed in various types of solutions was investigated. The results show that the leaching amount of the lead ions from the specimens immersed in CaCl2 solution was three times as large as that in the other solutions. However, the difference in the pore volume of the specimens after immersion between types of solutions was not observed. Besides, it is also found that in the case of the specimen with a water cement materials ratio of 0.40, the pore structures of mortar specimens were relatively denser and the pH value of the solution was lower compared with the case of the specimen with a water cement materials ratio of 0.55. This can result in smaller leaching amounts of heavy metals.


Document: 

SP-307-07

Date: 

March 1, 2016

Author(s):

Chris Ramseyer, Kyle Renevier, and Seth Roswurm

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

307

Abstract:

Type K Shrinkage Compensating Concrete (SCC) concrete is uniquely suited for use in slabs and walls because it typically requires fewer expansion joints than a convention portland cement (PC) concrete. This allows for continuous placement of much larger slabs and walls and facilitates the construction of high performance smooth slabs with few interruptions. Typically shrinkage-compensating concrete construction practice is to pour adjoining wall sections a minimum of five days apart in order to allow for the initial expansion of the material. The need for unrestrained expansion is implied in the ACI 223R-10 Design Guide in Chapter 5 in a discussion on sequencing the placement of wall segments. This paper discusses testing that was performed at two different locations, spanning both two different times of year and two unique climates. The tests used vibrating wire strain gages (VWSG) to investigate the restrained behavior of a wall segment in a six million gallon clear well tank in Springfield, IL, as well as the unrestrained behavior of two slabs-on-grade in Los Angeles, CA. Measurements were taken for a minimum of 30 days and a maximum of 170 days. Testing results are then compared to similar scenarios using ordinary PC concrete.


Document: 

SP296-09

Date: 

March 6, 2014

Author(s):

Ugur Ersoy, Tugrul Tankut, Ahmet Turer and Guney Ozcebe

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

296

Abstract:

This paper reports the structural rehabilitation of a 28 story reinforced concrete building. Structural assessment of this building was initiated upon observing damage in one column after five years of service. As a result of this investigation it was concluded that the main cause of damage in the column was temperature induced deformations. A total of 36 circular (spiral) and 46 square (tied) columns were strengthened by steel jacketing. After the completion of rehabilitation, 122 sensors were placed in the building at different locations to monitor the temperature changes and deformations in structural members. In the paper results of seven years of monitoring are also given.


Document: 

SP290-05

Date: 

September 14, 2012

Author(s):

Robert T. Bates, Erik Holck, Miles Dee, Michael King

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

290

Abstract:

Constructing large capacity, monolithically placed water storage tank slabs is a complex proposition. Previously, specifying low-shrinkage concrete mixes and monolithic placement of the slab within a specified time period was the prescribed method, yet shrinkage cracking still occurred. We felt more could be done to improve concrete placing and finishing, reducing shrinkage cracking and enhance durability. An investigation on the use of an Internally Cured Concrete mix on the floor and roof slabs of the Denver Water 10-Million Gallon [MG] (38-Million Liter [ML]) Lone Tree Tank No. 2 that Bates Engineering Inc. was designing was pursued. The tank floor and roof slab are each about 61,000 ft2 (5,700 m2) and would be monolithically placed. Laboratory trial batches performed determined plastic and hardened characteristics of the ICC as compared to traditionally proportioned mix designs. Tests performed in the laboratory included: compressive strength and drying shrinkage (ASTM C 157(1), modified 7-day saturation). An ICC mix was selected based on durability expectations. Results of the floor slab placement were successful and only two shrinkage cracks were observed, 7-day and 28-day compressive strength tests, workability and consistency surpassed expectations. As a result, it was decided to use ICC concrete on the remaining structural components.

DOI:

10.14359/51684174


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