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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 376 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP-343_09

Date: 

October 1, 2020

Author(s):

Ferrara, L.; Asensio, E.C.; Lo Monte, F.; Snoeck, D.; De Belie, N.

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

343

Abstract:

The design of building structures and infrastructures is mainly based on four concepts: safety, serviceability, durability and sustainability. The latter is becoming increasingly relevant in the field of civil engineering. Reinforced concrete structures are subjected to conditions that produce cracks which, if not repaired, can lead to a rapid deterioration and would result in increasing maintenance costs to guarantee the anticipated level of performance. Therefore, self-healing concrete can be very useful in any type of structure, as it allows to control and repair cracks as soon as they to occur. As a matter of fact, the synergy between fibre-reinforced cementitious composites and selfhealing techniques may result in promising solutions. Fibres improve the self-healing process due to their capacity to restrict crack widths and enable multiple crack formation. In particular, cracks smaller than 30-50 μm are able to heal completely. Moreover, in the case of High Performance Fibre Reinforced Cementitious Composites (HPFRCC), high content of cementitious/pozzolanic materials and low water-binder ratios are likely to make the composites naturally conducive to self-healing. In this framework the main goal of this paper is twofold. On the one hand, a state-of-the-art survey on self-healing of fibre-reinforced cementitious composites will be provided. This will be analysed with the goal of providing a “healable crack opening based” design concept which could pave the way for the incorporation of healing concepts into design approaches for FRC and also conventional R/C structures. On the other hand, the same state-of-the-art will be instrumental in identifying research needs, which still have to be addressed for the proper use of self-healing fibre-reinforced cementitious composites in the construction field.


Document: 

SP-337_05

Date: 

January 23, 2020

Author(s):

Kjell Tore Fosså and Widianto

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

337

Abstract:

This paper describes the development in concrete technology for offshore concrete structures from the 1970’s until now and discusses some potential topics for future research which would result in more cost-effective offshore concrete structures.

Most of the offshore concrete structures constructed in the last 4 decades are still in operation, with no or only minor maintenance required, even though the average age for these structures in the North Sea is more than 25 years. The compressive strength in offshore structures has gradually increased from about 40MPa (5800 psi) in the 1970’s to more than 100MPa (14500 psi) in some of the latest concrete structures. Standards and concrete specifications have been revised several times during these years. In parallel, the knowledge from several research and development programs has been used to further improve the concrete properties and overcome the limitations. Focus has been primarily to improve the compressive strength of the concrete as well as the durability and concrete workability. The cement and admixture industry have been heavily involved in research programs to further adapt and develop these material properties. The result of the product developments in the concrete constituency has also improved cost-effectiveness and durability (including overall life-cycle cost-effectiveness) for offshore concrete structures.

With the new generation technology, the technical limitations we face today will be overcome. With more knowledge and improved technology, the quantity and size of cracks in concrete in service are expected to be reduced, which would also improve durability. In addition, the focus in the future will also be on sustainable and environmentally friendly materials.


Document: 

SP-336_02

Date: 

December 11, 2019

Author(s):

Nidhi M Modha and Pratanu Ghosh

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

336

Abstract:

In this research, a natural pozzolanic cementitious material known as zeolite is being utilized to investigate the performance of High-Performance Concrete (HPC). Several binary (cement+zeolite) and ternary (cement+zeolite+other supplementary cementitious material) based concrete mixtures including a control mixture of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) with water - cementitious (w/cm) ratios of 0.40 and 0.44 are cast by replacing cement with different percentage level of zeolite material. The purpose of this study is to investigate effectiveness of zeolite material by means of long term compressive strength (7 to 91 days), tensile strength, modulus of elasticity and corrosion resistance in several concrete mixtures from 7 to 28 days. The compressometer is utilized for the measurement of the modulus of elasticity and Universal Testing Machine (UTM) is utilized to measure the compressive and tensile strength of concrete. In addition, a 4-point Wenner Probe resistivity meter is tested to determine the surface electrical resistivity of concrete, which provides an indirect indication of permeability and in turn, chloride induced corrosion durability in reinforced concrete structures. Overall, zeolite based concrete mixtures with 0.40 w/cm ratio and ¾ inch aggregate size provide promising results in terms of compressive strength, tensile strength and remarkable improvement on corrosion resistance in terms of achievement of surface resistivity data.


Document: 

SP-335_04

Date: 

September 20, 2019

Author(s):

Douglas Hendrix, Nabil Bassim, and Kay Wille

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

335

Abstract:

There is significant potential for the use of nanoparticles in cementitious materials, especially in ultra-high performance concrete. These nanoparticles can further increase packing density, accelerate the pozzolanic reaction or can be used to induce new properties to the material, such as air purification or self-cleaning. Little is known about the interaction mechanisms between nanoparticles in cementitious materials, including their dispersion quality. The characterization of these nanoparticles can be challenging, especially when these nanoparticles interact with cementitious materials and their reaction products during hydration. Thorough characterization of the nanoparticle system is essential to understand how to optimize mixing constituents, procedures, and parameters.


Document: 

SP-335_06

Date: 

September 20, 2019

Author(s):

Su-Jin Lee, Shiho Kawashima, and Jong-Pil Won

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

335

Abstract:

In this study, nanosilica was applied to the surface of polypropylene (PP) fibers to introduce self-healing abilities when incorporated into cement-composites. When the fiber is at the site of a crack, the nanosilica can form additional hydration products through pozzolanic reaction to effectively seal the crack. Nanosilica was synthesized onto the fibers through a sol-gel process. Then the fibers were dried at room temperature or 50°C (122°F) to remove the excess solution and adhere the nanosilica particles onto the fiber surface. The existence of nanosilica was confirmed by observing the mass change before and after the sol-gel process, water absorption, soluble matter loss and microscopy. The self-healing performance of cement-composites reinforced with treated and untreated macro and micro PP fibers at dosages of 1.8kg/m3 (3.0lb/yd3) and 0.9kg/m3 (1.5lb/yd3), respectively, were evaluated through flexural strength testing according to ASTM C348. To evaluate strength recovery, samples were loaded to 60% of the peak load to induce cracking. The cracked specimens were cured for 28 days under laboratory conditions to undergo self-healing. A significant recovery in flexural strength (112.8%) was observed by using nanosilica treated micro PP fibers dried at room temperature.


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