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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 21 Abstracts search results

Document: 

20-253

Date: 

March 1, 2021

Author(s):

Goran Adil, Ceki Halmen, George Seegebrecht, and John T. Kevern

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

118

Issue:

2

Abstract:

Corrosion performance of reinforced pervious concrete was evaluated through field and laboratory evaluations. Two reinforced pervious cemetery walls in Chicago, IL, were visually evaluated, and samples were investigated through petrographic examination. Corrosion performance of two-layered concrete samples, with an outer layer of conventional concrete and an inner layer of pervious concrete, was evaluated in the laboratory. Results indicated that pervious concrete around the reinforcement can significantly delay the cracking and spalling of samples compared to conventional concrete. Chloride profiles of samples and instantaneous corrosion rate measurements showed that corrosion of reinforcement embedded in two-layered samples was similar to conventional concrete although two-layered samples provided a longer time to cracking. Laboratory results are in agreement with long service life performance observed in the field and with prior pervious concrete corrosion studies.

DOI:

10.14359/51730514


Document: 

19-438

Date: 

November 1, 2020

Author(s):

Sarah C. Baxter, Katherine A. Acton, and Rita E. Lederle

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

117

Issue:

6

Abstract:

Pervious concrete is a specialty concrete with a high pore volume fraction. The porosity and microstructure that give pervious concrete its characteristic permeability also limit aspects of performance, such as strength and durability. Microstructural parameters used in computational models of mechanical behavior can be quantified using image analysis. However, because pervious concrete has a random microstructure, measured values from a single image may not reflect the “effective” behavior of the material. The appropriate size of a sample, known as a Representative Volume Element (RVE), may vary depending on the parameter under consideration. In this work, six microstructural parameters are measured using image analysis. Average values of these parameters were calculated as a function of sample size to illustrate convergence to a representative value. Representative values from image analysis were also compared with experimentally measured porosity. Results suggest appropriate RVEs for porosity, specific surface area, characteristic length, mean free spacing, characteristic pore diameter, and interfacial perimeter.

DOI:

10.14359/51728124


Document: 

19-188

Date: 

March 1, 2020

Author(s):

Kai Jiao, Chen Chen, Lei Li, Xun Shi, and Yong Wang

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

117

Issue:

2

Abstract:

To promote the application of pervious concrete (PC) in heavy-duty pavement engineering, a thick plate (approximately 50 to 100 cm) paving structure can be used, and its failure form mainly by fatigue compression. Therefore, compressive fatigue tests were carried out under fatigue loads in four stress levels (S): 0.6, 0.7, 0.8, and 0.9, at three loading frequencies of 10, 15, and 20 Hz. The results showed that the fatigue life (N) and fatigue residual strength are controlled by S, while loading frequency showed no statistically significant effect on them. The fatigue failure of PC will not occur under a stress level of 0.6. The survival rate of PC and the fatigue life of uniaxial compression obey a Weibull distribution with two parameters. The material constants of uniaxial compression fatigue of PC are 0.0464 to 0.052, which are similar to ordinary concrete. There are two forms of fatigue failure: one is the shearing along the vertical central axis and the other is shear failure at an angle of 15 to 30 degrees with the vertical central axis.

DOI:

10.14359/51722402


Document: 

16-355

Date: 

May 1, 2018

Author(s):

Gang Xu and Xianming Shi

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

115

Issue:

3

Abstract:

An environmentally friendly pervious concrete was developed by using fly ash as the sole binder modified by graphene oxide (GO). The density, void ratio, mechanical strength, Young’s modulus, infiltration rate, deicer salt scaling, and degradation resistance of this pervious concrete were measured against three control groups. The test results indicated that the addition of 0.02% GO (by weight of fly ash) significantly increased compressive strength, split tensile strength, Young’s modulus, deicer salt scaling resistance, and degradation resistance of the fly ash pervious concrete. Overall, this innovative fly ash pervious concrete showed a comparable performance to portland cement pervious concrete. A microscopic investigation using an electron microprobe was also conducted to obtain more insights on the effects of GO and chemical activators on the fly ash pervious concrete.

DOI:

10.14359/51701126


Document: 

16-225

Date: 

March 1, 2017

Author(s):

Somayeh Nassiri and Benjamin Nantasai

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

114

Issue:

2

Abstract:

Thermal conductivity (K) of pervious concrete specimens was measured using the heat-flow meter and the thermal needle probe methods. The two test methods were first conducted on 285.75 mm (11.25 in.) dry square slabs with varying porosities (φ) from 19 to 36%. Strong linear K-φ relationships were obtained based on both methods. On average, K for the slabs was 0.50 W/(mK) using the heat-flow meter, and 0.62 W/(mK) by the needle probe. Using the needle probe, 4% water in the slabs resulted in a 20% increase in K. One-hundred millimeter (4 in.) diameter cylinders were saw cut in half and were tested for K at the top and bottom. K-φ were obtained for the cylinder halves using the needle probe. The mean geometric model showed a near-perfect fit for the slabs in dry conditions. The model fit reasonably well to the top cylinders’ K and overestimated K for bottom cylinders with a mean square error of 0.012 W/(mK).

DOI:

10.14359/51689492


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