International Concrete Abstracts Portal

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  • The International Concrete Abstracts Portal is an ACI led collaboration with leading technical organizations from within the international concrete industry and offers the most comprehensive collection of published concrete abstracts.

International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-10 of 19 Abstracts search results

Document: 

19-188

Date: 

March 1, 2020

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

117

Issue:

2


Document: 

16-355

Date: 

May 1, 2018

Author(s):

Gang Xu and Xianming Shi

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

115

Issue:

3

Abstract:

An environmentally friendly pervious concrete was developed by using fly ash as the sole binder modified by graphene oxide (GO). The density, void ratio, mechanical strength, Young’s modulus, infiltration rate, deicer salt scaling, and degradation resistance of this pervious concrete were measured against three control groups. The test results indicated that the addition of 0.02% GO (by weight of fly ash) significantly increased compressive strength, split tensile strength, Young’s modulus, deicer salt scaling resistance, and degradation resistance of the fly ash pervious concrete. Overall, this innovative fly ash pervious concrete showed a comparable performance to portland cement pervious concrete. A microscopic investigation using an electron microprobe was also conducted to obtain more insights on the effects of GO and chemical activators on the fly ash pervious concrete.

DOI:

10.14359/51701126


Document: 

16-225

Date: 

March 1, 2017

Author(s):

Somayeh Nassiri and Benjamin Nantasai

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

114

Issue:

2

Abstract:

Thermal conductivity (K) of pervious concrete specimens was measured using the heat-flow meter and the thermal needle probe methods. The two test methods were first conducted on 285.75 mm (11.25 in.) dry square slabs with varying porosities (φ) from 19 to 36%. Strong linear K-φ relationships were obtained based on both methods. On average, K for the slabs was 0.50 W/(mK) using the heat-flow meter, and 0.62 W/(mK) by the needle probe. Using the needle probe, 4% water in the slabs resulted in a 20% increase in K. One-hundred millimeter (4 in.) diameter cylinders were saw cut in half and were tested for K at the top and bottom. K-φ were obtained for the cylinder halves using the needle probe. The mean geometric model showed a near-perfect fit for the slabs in dry conditions. The model fit reasonably well to the top cylinders’ K and overestimated K for bottom cylinders with a mean square error of 0.012 W/(mK).

DOI:

10.14359/51689492


Document: 

13-094

Date: 

September 1, 2015

Author(s):

Ian Anderson and Mandar M. Dewoolkar

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

112

Issue:

5

Abstract:

This laboratory study investigated the durability of pervious concrete containing fly ash to freezing and thawing and salt exposure in a field-representative environment. Pervious concrete was prepared by replacing cement with 0, 10, 20, and 30% fly ash. The specimens were subjected to one slow freezing-and-thawing cycle per day up to 100 days in a drained condition with sodium chloride solution with concentrations of 0, 2, 4, 8, and 12%. The void content, compressive strength, and hydraulic conductivity of the mixtures were all within the range of typical pervious concrete applications. Freezing-and-thawing testing suggested that for all concentrations of salt solution, 10 and 20% fly ash replacement improved freezing-and-thawing durability. Specimens with 30% fly ash showed more damage than that of the 0% control. The greatest damage from salt solutions was seen in 8%, 4%, and 2% concentrations, respectively. Water and 12% salt solution showed little damage across all mixture designs.

DOI:

10.14359/51687921


Document: 

13-303

Date: 

March 1, 2015

Author(s):

Yail J. Kim, Shahlaa Al Wakeel, Adel Gaddafi, and Young-Jin Cha

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

112

Issue:

2

Abstract:

This paper presents a case study for examining the in-place performance of pervious concrete in a medium-size parking lot in Denver, CO. Of interest are the surface characteristics and hydraulic properties of the concrete dependent upon the degree of deterioration. Test results include pavement texture depth, skid resistance, surface profile, infiltration, and traffic volume. A statistical approach, analysis of variance, is conducted to evaluate the distinct surface properties of various locations in the parking lot. Mutual independency between the surface texture depth and skid resistance is discussed. A practice-oriented predictive model is proposed to estimate an international roughness index of pervious concrete using a texture depth value and skid resistance. A relationship between the infiltration of the pervious concrete and traffic attributes is established. The performance reliability of the parking lot is evaluated in conjunction with critical rainfall intensity.

DOI:

10.14359/51686993


Document: 

11-391

Date: 

January 1, 2014

Author(s):

Mark Suozzo and Mandar M. Dewoolkar

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

111

Issue:

1

Abstract:

Various methods for compressive strength and hydraulic testing for pervious concrete were investigated. No statistically significant differences were found in compressive strength measurements between elastomeric pad- and sulfur-capped specimens; due to the simpler preparation method, elastomeric pad capping is recommended. Statistically significant differences were observed in compressive strength measurements between specimens with a length-diameter ratio (L D) of 2:1 and 1.5:1. Specimens with an L D of 1:1 produced inconsistent strength measurements. Hydraulic conductivity correlated linearly to the infiltration rates from single ring, double ring and falling head infiltrometers, and was smaller than the infiltration rates by factors of 1.8, 1.5, and 9.0, respectively, for 6 in. (152 mm) thick pervious concrete. The falling head infiltrometer can be used for a quick estimate of infiltration rate; if used, its measurement can be divided by 5 to estimate infiltration rate from the single ring infiltrometer.

DOI:

10.14359/51686444


Document: 

109-M15

Date: 

March 12, 2012

Author(s):

Luis A. Mata and Michael L. Leming

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

109

Issue:

2

Abstract:

Pervious concrete pavement systems (PCPSs) are a unique and effective means to address important environmental issues and support green, sustainable growth by capturing storm water and allowing it to infiltrate into the underlying soil. Sedimentation leading to clogging, however, is a potential problem in the serviceability of PCPS. The sedimentation rates of pervious concrete with 20% porosity were examined with three different soil types: sand, clayey silt, and clayey silty sand. Pervious concrete cylinder specimens were exposed to sediments mixed in water to simulate runoff with a typical load of soil sediments. Falling head permeability tests were performed on the specimens before and after exposure—that is, sedimentation. Results show that the exfiltration rate can be affected by sediment characteristics in some situations.

DOI:

10.14359/51683701


Document: 

109-M21

Date: 

March 12, 2012

Author(s):

Milani S. Sumanasooriya, Omkar Deo, and Narayanan Neithalath

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

109

Issue:

2

Abstract:

This paper presents a rational methodology based on particle packing concepts for the material design of pervious concretes. The virtual packing densities of the components of the mixture, the actual packing density of the mixture, and the corresponding volume fractions are used to determine a compaction index. To achieve the design porosity, adjustments to the material volume fractions and/or the compaction effort are required when only a hypothetical minimum paste volume fraction is used. These adjustments result in two distinct means of proportioning pervious concretes—one where extra paste volume is added and the other in which a combination of a small increase in paste volume and additional compaction effort is used to achieve the design porosity. The compaction index is shown to be related to the porosity and the compaction energy. These relationships facilitate the development of iso-compaction energy curves. The compaction index-porosity relationship for a certain applied compaction energy is shown to be a powerful material design tool for pervious concretes. The designed and actual (fresh and hardened) porosities are found to be fairly close to each other. The influence of these proportioning methodologies on the hardened state properties (compressive strength and permeability) is also discussed.

DOI:

10.14359/51683707


Document: 

108-M47

Date: 

July 1, 2011

Author(s):

John T. Kevern, Vernon R. Schaefer, and Kejin Wang

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

108

Issue:

4

Abstract:

This paper describes the results of studies to develop pervious concrete for use as an overlay material over traditional concrete to reduce noise, minimize splash and spray, and improve friction as a surface wearing course. Workability and compaction density testing methods were developed to ensure constructibility and placement consistency. The mixture testing matrix consisted of evaluating aggregate type and gradation, cementitious material amounts and composition, and various admixtures. Selected mixtures were tested for permeability, strength, workability, overlay bond strength, and freezing-and-thawing durability. The selected mixture was self-consolidating and slip-formable and was placed at the MnROAD testing facility during late October 2008. The test results indicate that pervious concrete mixtures can be designed to be highly workable, sufficiently strong, permeable, and have excellent freezing-and-thawing durability, thus being suitable for pavement overlays.

DOI:

10.14359/51683117


Document: 

108-M21

Date: 

March 1, 2011

Author(s):

Zhifu Yang

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

108

Issue:

2

Abstract:

This research investigates the durability of pervious concrete under simulated field conditions, including slow cyclic freezing and thawing, wet-dry environments, and salt applications. Specifically, this research examines the effects of materials and proportions and curing conditions on the freezing-and-thawing durability of pervious concrete. Generally, air curing causes a dramatic reduction in the freezing-and-thawing durability as compared with water curing. Silica fume additions are observed to improve the performance of water-cured pervious concrete during slow freezing and thawing while causing a significant drop in the performance of air-cured specimens. Polypropylene fibers are seen to enhance the resistance of pervious concrete to repeated freezing and thawing, whereas salt applications are noted to aggravate the deterioration. In addition, wet-dry cycles are found to slow down the freezing-and-thawing damage development when the duration of the wet cycle is less than 3 days.

DOI:

10.14359/51682312


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