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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 46 Abstracts search results

Document: 

20-044

Date: 

November 1, 2020

Author(s):

Eyubhan Avcı and Murat Mollamahmutoglu

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

117

Issue:

6

Abstract:

The strength and permeability properties of various graded sand specimens grouted with superfine cement suspensions containing an additive of fine fly ash were experimentally investigated. To start with, such rheological properties as viscosity, bleeding, and setting time of superfine cement and fine fly ash mixture suspensions with various water-cement ratios (w/c) were determined. Then, the injectability tests with the mixtures were conducted on various graded sand samples. Finally, the unconfined compressive strength and the falling head permeability tests were run on the grouted specimens at different time intervals. The setting times and viscosities of superfine cement and fine fly ash mixture suspensions increased, but their bleedings were reduced. The addition of fine fly ash to superfine cement suspensions reduced the groutability of suspensions and hence increased the grouting pressure of sand specimens. The unconfined compressive strength of superfine cement grouted sand samples were increased and their permeabilities were reduced with the addition of fine fly ash. Moreover, the addition of fine fly ash to superfine cement grouts accelerated the grouted specimens’ strength gain.

DOI:

10.14359/51728131


Document: 

18-011

Date: 

November 1, 2019

Author(s):

A. Shakir, M. Haziman Wan Ibrahim, N. Othman, A. Ahmed, and S. Shahidan

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

116

Issue:

6

Abstract:

Palm oil fuel ash (POFA) is a by-product procured from the palm oil mill through the incineration of empty fruit bunches, mesocarp fibers, and shells so as to produce electricity. POFA was considerably used as a cementitous supplement in various types of concrete, bricks, blocks, mortar, and grout due to its pozzolanic content. However, using raw POFA as cementitious replacement caused a distinct deterioration on the properties of the hardened mixture. Therefore, various treatment methodologies were adopted to enhance the properties of POFA to improve the mechanical properties of the hardened mixture. This study reviews the treatment approaches performed on POFA and their effects on the physical, chemical, and microstructural properties of POFA. It was documented that grinding POFA increased its fineness and decreased the voids and porosity of the mixture. However, the optimum use of grounded POFA was ranged 5 to 25% by weight of cement. On the other hand, thermal treatment of POFA exhibited a substantial improvement on the physical, chemical, and morphological properties of POFA; consequently, the hardened properties were dramatically developed. Thermal-treated POFA could be used as binder supplement up to 70% by weight of cement, whereby environmental pollution was dropped and sustainability was achieved. It was concluded that the higher fineness of POFA contributed to a significant pozzolanic reaction and thus promoted better performance in the hardened matrix. However, future detections should address the leaching behavior of POFA and the leaching performance of the hardened mixture incorporating POFA. Besides, the durability of specimens containing POFA as binder supplement should be well covered in the prospectus research.

DOI:

10.14359/51716975


Document: 

17-194

Date: 

March 1, 2018

Author(s):

George J. Zimmer, Robert Flynn, Eric Musselman, and Jeremy Young

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

115

Issue:

2

Abstract:

Roller-compacted concrete (RCC) is often used to construct hydraulic structures, and in gravity dam applications, a facing system is required to control seepage along lift lines. One facing system that is gaining popularity is grout-enriched RCC (GERCC). This innovative process requires the addition of a neat cement grout to the uncompacted RCC along the face, followed by internal vibration to combine the material. One limitation of GERCC is previous research has shown difficulty in entraining air in this system. This study optimized the grout formulation to develop a stable air void system, and then evaluated the effect of this grout on the freezing-and-thawing resistance of GERCC produced both in the lab and during a field trial. Additionally, various grout placement techniques, grout dosages, and vibration levels were evaluated. The results show that freezing-and-thawing-resistant GERCC can be created when the grout and RCC are thoroughly combined.

DOI:

10.14359/51701236


Document: 

17-044

Date: 

November 1, 2017

Author(s):

Tara L. Cavalline, Reid W. Castrodale, Charles Freeman, and Jody Wall

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

114

Issue:

6

Abstract:

The porous structure of manufactured structural lightweight aggregate (LWA) is responsible for differences in mechanical, durability, and thermal performance of lightweight concrete (LWC) compared to normalweight concrete (NWC). The thermal properties of LWC have not been widely studied, and publications containing values of heat capacity and thermal conductivity for LWC provide few if any details on materials, mixture proportions, and moisture states. In this study, testing was performed to determine the thermal conductivity and heat capacity of sand lightweight concrete (SLWC), alllightweight concrete (ALWC), and NWC mixtures for building and transportation applications, as well as lightweight and normalweight grout mixtures. Results of this study were evaluated then compared to published values to demonstrate the influence of this LWA on properties of the concrete and grout mixtures. Statistical models were developed to demonstrate the influence of expanded slate LWA on the thermal conductivity and heat capacity of the concrete studied.

DOI:

10.14359/51701003


Document: 

15-464

Date: 

January 1, 2017

Author(s):

Ahmed A. Gheni, Mohamed A. ElGawady, and John J. Myers

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

114

Issue:

1

Abstract:

An experimental investigation was conducted to investigate the effects of replacing varying percentages of fine natural aggregates with crumb rubber in concrete masonry units (CMUs), creating rubberized concrete masonry units (RCMUs). The mechanical and physical characteristics of RCMUs having 0, 10, 20, and 37% crumb rubber were investigated and presented in this paper. The unit weight and water absorption of RCMUs were measured. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis was used to study the global structure for RCMUs and the interfacial zone. RCMUs were also exposed to extreme weather conditions for 72 days inside an environmental chamber. Furthermore, RCMUs were subjected to rapid freezing-and-thawing tests. The RCMUs, as well as grouted and ungrouted masonry prisms, were tested under monotonic and cyclic axial loads. The results indicated that RCMUs with high rubber content displayed higher values of axial ultimate strains. RCMUs exhibited a significant strain softening while, conversely, failure was quite brittle in CMUs. RCMU specimens exhibited an improvement in compressive strength after several cycles of severe weather exposure. The CMU specimens, however, exhibited degradation in their compression strength capacity. The water absorption was higher in RCMUs than it was in the CMU prisms.

DOI:

10.14359/51689482


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