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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 132 Abstracts search results

Document: 

19-459

Date: 

November 1, 2020

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

117

Issue:

6


Document: 

19-435

Date: 

November 1, 2020

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

117

Issue:

6


Document: 

18-217

Date: 

May 1, 2019

Author(s):

Leo Barcley and Mervyn Kowalsky

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

116

Issue:

3

Abstract:

The fracture of longitudinal reinforcing steel causes the loss of load-carrying capacity in reinforced concrete (RC) members. Results of large-scale reverse cyclic column tests have indicated that the fracture of longitudinal reinforcement is influenced by the amount of buckling experienced by the reinforcing steel. Similar behavior was observed in a material test as reinforcing bars fractured in a brittle manner when pulled in tension after buckling. Brittle fracture occurred after the bending strain from buckling exceeded the critical bending strain. A material test was developed to quantify the critical bending strain, called the buckled bar tension test. The rib radius of the reinforcing bar was found to influence the magnitude of the critical bending strain. Additionally, the results of column tests indicated that the critical bending strain of the longitudinal reinforcement affected the column displacement capacity. Finally, a relationship between axial displacement and strain from bending was developed.

DOI:

10.14359/51715583


Document: 

18-139

Date: 

March 1, 2019

Author(s):

Jiaqing Wang, Qingli Dai, Shuaicheng Guo, and Ruizhe Si

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

116

Issue:

2

Abstract:

The reinforcement effects of four types of fibers on rubberized concrete were investigated. The fiber-reinforced rubber concrete specimens were produced with added 0.5% fiber based on the mixture volume, and 10% recycled tire rubber by the fine aggregate volume. The mechanical properties and shrinkage performance were evaluated and compared with the control rubber-only concrete samples. The results showed steel fibers could improve compressive, splitting tensile, and flexural strength, while synthetic fibers reduced the compressive and flexural strength as compared with control samples. However, all fiber-reinforced specimens dramatically improved fracture energy and post-crack extension compared with control specimens, especially the fracture energy, which increased approximately 10 to 50 times. The pullout resistance of different fibers was not influenced by added rubber. At the same time, the fiber-reinforced rubber concrete also showed reduced shrinkage. In summary, the performance of rubberized concrete could be effectively enhanced by fiber reinforcement, which can help to facilitate the applications of rubberized concrete.

DOI:

10.14359/51712266


Document: 

18-114

Date: 

January 1, 2019

Author(s):

R. Sakurada, K. Terui, M. Miyamoto, A. Ferrari, N. Sasaki, and A. Ishii

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

116

Issue:

1

Abstract:

This paper attempts to manufacture a kind of recycled aggregate by transforming remaining concrete at fresh state into a granular material (GM) in a field test, and reports on the strength characteristics of concrete made with GM. The GM contains fine aggregate (≤ 5 mm [0.20 in.]) and coarse aggregate (5 to 20 mm [0.20 to 0.79 in.]). The fresh ready mixed concrete was used in this field test in substitution of the remaining concrete that was trucking back from the construction site to a concrete mixing plant. The 28-day compressive strength of concrete made with GM can be achieved exceeding 30 MPa (4350 psi), which is the desirable strength for nonstructural concrete. The reinforcement with 1.5% polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibers enhanced the splitting tensile and flexural strengths of concrete made with GM by 35% and 21% as compared with the GM concrete without PVA fibers, respectively. The peak load at diagonal shear crack of reinforced concrete (RC) beam without stirrups, made with GM and 1.0% PVA fibers, is 29% higher than that of the control reinforced concrete beam without fibers.

DOI:

10.14359/51712241


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