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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 786 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP-337_03

Date: 

January 23, 2020

Author(s):

Jeremiah D. Fasl and Carl J. Larosche

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

337

Abstract:

This paper will present the challenges and unique aspects associated with increasing the capacity of one of the container wharves at Barbour’s Cut Terminal to support new Ship-to-Shore (STS) container cranes with gage lengths of 100 ft. (30 m), which was an upgrade from the previous container cranes that featured 50-ft. (15 m) gage lengths. The design criteria included achieving an additional 50 years of service life from the existing elements and new elements; therefore, the assessment results and techniques used for service life modeling will be discussed. In the new structural elements, service life modeling was used to determine the necessary concrete mixture characteristics, including use of fly ash and corrosion-resistant reinforcement, to achieve the required service life.

This paper will also discuss the design approach, including the use of springs to represent the soil-structure interaction, for determining the demands on the various components. In addition, the interaction between the new structure and existing structure and the resulting torsion will be discussed. Finally, various lessons learned from using strut-and-tie modeling, including the relative stiffness of the chord elements and need for three-dimensional modeling, will be summarized.


Document: 

SP-336_05

Date: 

December 11, 2019

Author(s):

Lisa E. Burris, Prasanth Alapati, Kimberly E. Kurtis, Amir Hajibabaee, M. Tyler Ley

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

336

Abstract:

Cement production is one of the largest contributors to CO2 emissions in the U.S. One method of reducing emissions associated with concrete is through usage of alternative cements (ACMs). Some of the more common ACMs include calcium sulfoaluminate cement, calcium aluminate cement, ternary calcium aluminate-calcium sulfate-portland cements, and chemicallyactivated binders, all of which have been shown to have lower carbon footprints than ordinary portland cement (OPC). However, the durability, and more specifically, the shrinkage behavior, of these cements has not been adequately examined, and must be better understood and able to be controlled before ACM concrete can be effectively used in the field. As a first step in increase understanding of shrinkage in ACMs, this paper examines chemical, autogenous, and drying shrinkage in the ACMs listed above. Results show that, despite greater quantities of chemical shrinkage, CSA, CAC, and chemically activated fly ash binder undergo less autogenous and drying shrinkage than OPC.


Document: 

SP-336_01

Date: 

December 11, 2019

Author(s):

James Lafikes, Rouzbeh Khajehdehi, Muzai Feng, Matthew O’Reilly, David Darwin

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

336

Abstract:

Supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) in conjunction with pre-wetted fine lightweight aggregate to provide internal curing are being increasingly used to produce high performance, low-shrinking concrete to mitigate bridge deck cracking, providing more sustainable projects with a longer service life. Additionally, the SCMs aid in concrete sustainability by reducing the amount of cement needed in these projects. This study examines the density of cracks in bridge decks in Indiana and Utah that incorporated internal curing with various combinations of portland cement and SCMs, specifically, slag cement, Class C and Class F fly ash, and silica fume, in concrete mixtures with water-cementitious material ratios ranging from 0.39 to 0.44. When compared with crack densities in low-cracking high-performance concrete (LC-HPC) and control bridge decks in Kansas, concrete mixtures with a paste content higher than 27% exhibited more cracking, regardless of the use of internal curing or SCMs. Bridge decks with paste contents below 26% that incorporate internal curing and SCMs exhibited low cracking at early ages, although additional surveys will be needed before conclusions on long term behavior can be made.


Document: 

SP-336_03

Date: 

December 11, 2019

Author(s):

Gang Xu, Luis Gerardo Navarro, Kafung Wong, and Xianming Shi

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

336

Abstract:

In this work, the freeze/thaw resistance and ambient-temperature salt resistance of fly ash geopolymer pervious concrete specimens were investigated separately, to isolate the physical and chemical phenomena underlying their deterioration during “salt scaling”. The laboratory investigation examined four groups of samples, with portland cement or activated fly ash as the sole binder, with or without graphene oxide (GO) modification, respectively. The incorporation of GO significantly improved the resistance of pervious concrete to freeze/ thaw cycles and ambient-temperature salt attack, regardless of the binder type. The specimens were then examined by using X-ray Diffraction (XRD) method, which revealed that the mineralogy and chemical composition of fly ash pastes differed significantly from those of cement pastes. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was also employed to study the chemical structure and ordering of different hydrates. This work provides an enhanced understanding into the freeze/thaw and salt scaling resistance of fly ash pervious concrete and the role of GO.


Document: 

SP-334-08

Date: 

September 30, 2019

Author(s):

Yasser Khodair, Arif Iqbal, and Mohammed Hussaini

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

334

Abstract:

This study discusses the results of an experimental program conducted to study the fresh, hardened and unrestrained shrinkage characteristics of self-consolidating concrete (SCC) using fine recycled asphalt pavement (FRAP) and high volume of supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) including class C fly-ash (FA) and slag (S). Sixteen mixtures were prepared with different percentages of FA, S, and FRAP. SCC mixtures were divided into four groups where each group had a different percentage of FRAP replacing fine aggregate (10%, 20%, 30%, 40%) and Portland cement being replaced by different percentages of SCMs. The water to cementitious material (w/cm) ratio of 0.4 was used for SCC mixtures with a target slump flow higher than 500 mm. The flowability, deformability, filling capacity and resistance to segregation were measured to determine the fresh properties of the mixtures. Moreover, the compressive strength at 14, 28, and 90 days and split tensile strength at 28 days were determined and durability characteristics including unrestrained shrinkage up to 90 days were tested. Analysis of experimental data showed that most of the mixtures satisfied the SCC fresh properties requirements. The addition of FRAP had an adverse effect on the compressive, tensile strength and unrestrained free shrinkage of SCC mixtures.


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