ABOUT THE INTERNATIONAL CONCRETE ABSTRACTS PORTAL

  • The International Concrete Abstracts Portal is an ACI led collaboration with leading technical organizations from within the international concrete industry and offers the most comprehensive collection of published concrete abstracts.

International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 440 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP-349_19

Date: 

April 22, 2021

Author(s):

J.Archez, N. Texier-Mandoki, X. Bourbon, J.F. Caron, and S. Rossignol

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

349

Abstract:

This work aims to study the influence of the shaping process on the mechanical properties of geopolymer composites reinforced with glass fibers and wollastonite. To this end, the synthesis feasibility of two geopolymer composite formulations was first determined. The influence of casting, extrusion and robocasting on mechanical properties was then studied with compressive and three-points bending tests and microstructural analysis. The results showed that the casting process is preferable to be used for low viscosity geopolymer composite while robocasting is more appropriate for geopolymer composite with high viscosity. The extruded and cast samples exhibit similar compressive data’s. The microstructural analysis showed that the robocasting process orients the fibers in the printing direction with an undefined interlayer. The casting process leads to a homogeneous material while the robocasting process conducts to an anisotropic material.


Document: 

SP346

Date: 

March 9, 2021

Author(s):

Sponsored by ACI Committee 345

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

346

Abstract:

A Sustainable built-environment requires a comprehensive process from material selection through to reliable management. Although traditional materials and methods still dominate the design and construction of our civil infrastructure, nonconventional reinforcing and strengthening methods for concrete bridges and structures can address the functional and economic challenges facing modern society. The use of advanced materials, such as fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) and ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC), alleviates the unfavorable aspects of every-day practices, offers many new opportunities, and promotes strategies that will be cost-effective, durable, and readily maintainable. Field demonstration is imperative to validate the innovative concepts and findings of laboratory research. Furthermore, documented case studies add value to the evaluation of emerging and maturing technologies, identify successful applications or aspects needing refinement, and ultimately inspire future endeavors. This Special Publication (SP) contains nine papers selected from three technical sessions held during the virtual ACI Fall Convention of October 2020. The first and second series of papers discuss retrofit and strengthening of super- and substructure members with a variety of techniques; and the remaining papers address new construction of bridges with internal FRP reinforcing and prestressing in beam, slabs, decks and retaining walls. All manuscripts were reviewed by at least two experts in accordance with the ACI publication policy. The Editors wish to thank all contributing authors and anonymous reviewers for their rigorous efforts. The Editors also gratefully acknowledge Ms. Barbara Coleman at ACI for her knowledgeable guidance.


Document: 

SP-347_07

Date: 

March 1, 2021

Author(s):

Andrew D. Sorensen, Robert J. Thomas, Ryan Langford and Abdullah Al-Sarfin

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

347

Abstract:

The impact resistance of concrete is becoming an increasingly important component of insuring the durability and resilience of critical civil engineering infrastructure. Design engineers are not currently able to use impact resistance as a performance-based specification in concrete due to a lack of a reliable standardized impact test for concrete. An improved method of the ACI standard, ACI 544.2R-89 Measurement of Properties of Fiber Reinforced Concrete, is developed that provides a resistance curve as a function of impact energy and number of blows (N) to failure. The curve provides information about the life cycle (N) under repeated sub-critical impact events and an estimate of the critical impact energy (where N=1), whereas the previous method provided only a relative value. The generated impact-fatigue curve provides useful information about damage accumulation under repeated impact events and the effectiveness of the fiber-reinforcement. In this paper, the improved method is demonstrated for three fiber types: steel, copolymer polypropylene, and a monofilament polypropylene. Additionally, the analytical solution for the specimen geometry is given as well as the theoretical considerations behind the development of the impact-life curve. The use of a specimen geometry provides a path to generalize the test results to full-scale structures.


Document: 

SP-347_02

Date: 

March 1, 2021

Author(s):

Jonathan Harman, Emmanuella O. Atunbi, and Alan Lloyd

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

347

Abstract:

Many common building materials, such as concrete and steel, are understood to experience a change in apparent material properties under high strain rates. This effect is often incorporated into impact and blast design by using dynamic increase factors (DIFs) that modify properties of the material such as strength and stiffness when subjected to high strain rates. There is currently limited guidance on dynamic properties of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) sheets bonded to concrete. Since FRP is a common retrofit material for blast and impact load vulnerable structures, it is important to have a full understanding on the behaviour of the FRP material and of the composite action between the FRP sheet and the substrate it is bonded to. Important parameters for blast and impact resistant design of reinforced concrete structures retrofitted with surface bonded FRP include dynamic measures of debonding strain, development length, and bond stress. This paper presents the results of an experimental program measuring the dynamic properties of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets bonded to concrete under impact induced high strain rates.

A series of rectangular concrete prisms were cast and fitted with surface bonded CFRP sheets to facilitate pull-out shear tests that directly measure the FRP to concrete bond. The bonded length of the CFRP sheet was variable with three different lengths explored. A series of static tests have been conducted to measure the strain fields on the FRP sheets under load up to failure. These strain fields, which were measured with digital image correlation techniques, were used to determine development length, bond stress, and ultimate strain of the FRP sheet prior to debonding. A companion set of prisms have also been cast and will be tested under impact loading to explore the same properties at high strain rates of around 1 s-1. Initial test results indicate a potential increase in both ultimate strain and bond stress, and a decrease in development length under high strain rates. The results of the larger study will be compiled and, when compared with the static companion set, be used to propose DIFs for FRP sheets bonded to concrete for use in design in high strain rate applications.

However, the main constitutive phases of SHCC, i.e. matrix, fibers and interphase between them, are highly rate sensitive. Depending on the SHCC composition, the increase in loading rates can negatively alter the balanced micromechanical interactions, leading to a pronounced reduction in strain capacity. Thus, there is need for a detailed investigation of the strain rate sensitivity of SHCC at different levels of observation for enabling a targeted material design with respect to high loading rates.

The crack opening behavior is an essential material parameter for SHCC, since it defines to a large extent the tensile properties of the composite. In the paper at hand, the rate effects on the crack opening and fracture behavior of SHCC are analyzed based on quasi-static and impact tensile tests on notched specimens made of three different types of SHCC. Two SHCC consisted of a normal-strength cementitious matrix and were reinforced with polyvinyl-alcohol (PVA) and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibers, respectively. The third type consisted of a high-strength cementitious matrix and UHMWPE fibers. The dynamic tests were performed in a split Hopkinson tension bar and enabled an accurate description of the crack opening behavior in terms of force-displacement relationships at displacement rates of up to 6 m/s (19.7 ft/s).


Document: 

SP345

Date: 

February 19, 2021

Author(s):

ACI Committee 549

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

345

Abstract:

Sponsors: ACI Committee 549, Rilem-MCC Editors: Barzin Mobasher and Flávio de Andrade Silva Several state-of-the-art sessions on textile-reinforced concrete/fabric-reinforced cementitious matrix (TRC/FRCM) were organized by ACI Committee 549 in collaboration with RILEM TC MCC during the ACI Fall 2019 Convention in Cincinnati, OH, and the ACI Virtual Technical Presentations in June 2020. The forum provided a unique opportunity to collect information and present knowledge in the field of TRC and FRCM as sustainable construction materials. The term TRC is typically used for new construction applications whereas the term FRCM refers to the repair applications of existing concrete and masonry. Both methods use a textile mesh as reinforcement and a cementitious-based matrix component and, due to high tensile and flexural strength and ductility, can be used to support structural loads. The technical sessions aimed to promote the technology, and document and develop recommendations for testing, design, and analysis, as well as to showcase the key features of these ductile and strong cement composite systems. New methods for characterization of key parameters were presented, and the results were collected towards the development of technical and state-of-the-art papers. Textile types include polymer-based (low and high stiffness), glass, natural, basalt, carbon, steel, and hybrid, whereas the matrix can include cementitious, geopolymers, and lightweight matrix (aggregates). Additives such as short fibers, fillers, and nanomaterials were also considered. The sessions were attended by researchers, designers, students, and participants from the construction and fiber industries. The presence of people with different expertise and from different regions of the world provided a unique opportunity to share knowledge and promote collaborative efforts. The experience of an online technical forum was a success and may be used for future opportunities. The workshop technical sessions chairs sincerely thank the ACI staff for doing a wonderful job in organizing the virtual sessions and ACI TC 549 and Rilem TC MCC for the collaboration.


12345...>>

Results Per Page 




Please enter this 5 digit unlock code on the web page.