ABOUT THE INTERNATIONAL CONCRETE ABSTRACTS PORTAL

  • The International Concrete Abstracts Portal is an ACI led collaboration with leading technical organizations from within the international concrete industry and offers the most comprehensive collection of published concrete abstracts.

International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 427 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP-344_05

Date: 

October 1, 2020

Author(s):

Constantin E. Chalioris, and Chris G. Karayannis

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

344

Abstract:

Recently the use of special reinforcement arrangements has been extended in reinforced concrete members under torsion. These arrangements include (a) continuous rectangular spiral reinforcement, (b) epoxy bonded Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (C-FRP) sheets as external transverse reinforcement and (c) short steel fibers as mass reinforcement. In this study an extended experimental program of 14 beams tested under torsion is presented. All specimens have the same geometrical characteristics but different transverse reinforcement arrangements. Six beams are used as pilot specimens; three of them have no transverse reinforcement and three have conventional steel stirrups. Further, two specimens have continuous steel spirals; four specimens have steel fibers as mass reinforcement and two specimens have externally bonded C-FRP sheets. The torsional behavior of these specimens is presented and compared to the behavior of the pilot specimens. Discussion and explanatory design examples about the application of these reinforcements are also included.


Document: 

SP-343_16

Date: 

October 1, 2020

Author(s):

Meda, A.; Rinaldi, Z.; Spagnuolo, S.; De Rivaz, B.; Giamundo, N.

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

343

Abstract:

The interest in using fiber reinforced concrete (FRC) for the production of precast segments in tunnel lining, installed with Tunnel Boring Machines (TBMs), is continuously growing, as witnessed by the studies available in literature and by the actual applications. The possibility of adopting a hybrid solution of FRC tunnel segments with Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) reinforcement is investigated herein. Full-scale tests were carried out on FRC segments with and without GFRP cage, with a typical geometry of metro tunnels. In particular, both flexural and point load full-scale tests were carried out, for the evaluation of the structural performances (both in terms of structural capacity and crack pattern evolution) under bending, and under the TBM thrust. Finally, the obtained results are compared, in order to judge the effectiveness of the proposed technical solution.


Document: 

SP-340-07

Date: 

April 1, 2020

Author(s):

Sary A. Malak and Neven Krstulovic-Opara

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

340

Abstract:

This paper provides an overview of simplified methods for dynamic blast analysis of structural members. The presented approach focuses on the use of a general simplified non-linear single degree of freedom dynamic model commonly used for typical flexural members such as slabs, beams or columns. The presented approach also allows modeling of members retrofitted against blast loading using fiber composites. The fiber composites considered in this paper include conventional Steel Fiber Reinforced Composites (FRC) as well as High Performance Fiber Composites (HPFRC). HPFRC’s include Short Steel Slurry Infiltrated Concrete (SIFCON), Long Continuous Slurry Infiltrated Steel Fibers Mat Concrete (SIMCON), and Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP). The model identifies different material parameters that affect the response of the structure. The effect of the material properties on the composite response is discussed within the framework of the existing blast-resistance guidelines and standards. Different retrofit techniques for existing concrete structures using fiber reinforced composites and the effect of varying the composite material properties on the response is presented. Final conclusions and recommendations are provided in terms of composite material’s properties, modeling performance and response. Specific limitations on their use is also discussed.


Document: 

SP-340-14

Date: 

April 1, 2020

Author(s):

Raymon W. Nickle and Yail J. Kim

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

340

Abstract:

With over 80 years of history, it is only in the last 20 years that the use of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) materials has become feasible for bridge applications in part due to the ever increasing requirement to make structures last longer, with the current American Association of State Highway Transportation Officials (AASHTO) Load and Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) Bridge Design Specifications requiring that structures be designed for a 75 year design life; but also in the development of cost effective production techniques, and the introduction of FRP materials, which bring the cost and strength of FRP materials closer to traditional steel reinforcement. Published documents provide comprehensive recommendations on design methodology, predictive equations, and recommendations for strength and service limits states. In this paper, the background of FRP-prestressed concrete bridges is discussed and trial bridges are designed. Research needs to advance the state of the art are identified and delineated.


Document: 

SP-340-10

Date: 

April 1, 2020

Author(s):

Santosh Timilsina, Nur Yazdani, Eyosias Beneberu, and Abel Mulenga

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

340

Abstract:

Fire is a possible hazard on highway bridges which causes significant economic damage, and it is also one of the least investigated of all hazards. There is a lack of knowledge on the long term performance and structural integrity of fire damaged and fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) laminate retrofitted bridges. One such rare in-service bridge was selected for this study. The fire damaged cast-in-place non-prestressed girders were previously repaired with mortar and strengthened with FRP wrapping. The girders were instrumented with strain gages and displacement transducers, and a non-destructive live load test was carried out to evaluate the structural response. The results from the load testing were used to compare two identical girder spans with and without CFRP strengthening. A full-scale non-linear finite element model of the overall bridge superstructure was created, and the test results used to calibrate the model. The carbon (CFRP) strengthened girder exhibited similar stiffness compared to the undamaged girder as evidenced by almost equivalent mid-span deflection. The girder moment capacity decreased significantly due to fire damage, and the CFRP strengthening plus mortar repair was successful in restoring the moment capacity. The finite element model provided good correlation with load test results.


12345...>>

Results Per Page 




Please enter this 5 digit unlock code on the web page.