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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 56 Abstracts search results

Document: 

19-244

Date: 

May 1, 2020

Author(s):

Hadi Bahmani, Davood Mostofinejad, and Sayyed Ali Dadvar

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

117

Issue:

3

Abstract:

This study investigated the effects of different synthetic and mineral fibers and limestone powder on the mechanical properties of ultra-high-performance fiber-reinforced concrete (UHPFRC). For the purpose of this study, 16 mixture designs and 204 prism specimens were prepared and cured under either of wet or autoclave conditions. Measurements revealed that mixtures containing synthetic fibers recorded considerable compressive and flexural strengths close to the steel fiber-reinforced mixtures. Specimens reinforced with nylon fibers as the best fibers in this study exhibited a much better flexural performance in terms of flexural strength, deflection capacity, and post-peak ductility than did those containing ceramic and polyester fibers. Finally, specimens containing limestone powder recorded acceptable flexural strength, which was close to those only containing silica fume. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) test showed that limestone powder increased ettringite content due to the dilution effect at 180 days as the main reason for decreasing of compressive strength of mixtures.

DOI:

10.14359/51724596


Document: 

19-137

Date: 

March 1, 2020

Author(s):

Assem A. A. Hassan

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

117

Issue:

2

Abstract:

This study investigated the structural behavior of large-scale rubberized self-consolidating engineered cementitious composite (SCECC) beams designed to fail in shear. Specifically, the experimental program focused on the use of crumb rubber (CR) and powder rubber (PR) in SCECC as a partial replacement of silica sand at replacement levels of 0, 10, 20, and 30% (by volume). All cast SCECC, SCECC-CR, and SCECC-PR beams were compared with the performance of normal self-consolidating concrete (SCC) beam (containing coarse aggregates) at comparable compressive strength. The results obtained from this study included the fresh and mechanical properties of the developed mixtures, in addition to load-deflection curves, cracking behavior, first flexural crack load, diagonal crack load, ultimate load, ductility, and energy absorption capacity of the tested beams. The performance of some code-based equations in estimating the ultimate capacity and cracking moment of the tested beams was also evaluated. The results showed that all SCECC, SCECC-CR, and SCECC-PR beams exhibited higher performance compared to that exhibited by the normal SCC beam. However, the inclusion of either CR or PR in SCECC led to a reduction in the first crack load, diagonal crack, and ultimate load capacity of SCECC. The ductility and energy absorption capacity of SCECC was found to increase when 10% CR was introduced, while further increase in the percentage of CR decayed both the ductility and energy absorption capacity. On the other hand, the use of PR with up to 30% contributed to improving the deformability of the SCECC beam with no significant loss in its load-carrying capacity, thus providing a sustainable composite with higher ductility and energy absorption.

DOI:

10.14359/51720300


Document: 

18-235

Date: 

May 1, 2019

Author(s):

Nabila Zemour, Alireza Asadian, Ehab A. Ahmed, Brahim Benmokrane, and Kamal H. Khayat

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

116

Issue:

3

Abstract:

This study investigated the effect of several parameters on the bond behavior of spliced glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) reinforcing bars in self-consolidating concrete (SCC) and normal concrete (NC). A total of 21 full-scale reinforced concrete (RC) beams were tested under four-point bending up to failure. Six influential design Code parameters were investigated, specifically concrete type, casting position, casting height, splice length, beam height, and longitudinal reinforcement type. The experimental results and observations reveal that the SCC and NC beams behaved similarly in terms of failure load, crack pattern, failure mode, and load-deflection response. The bond strength of the spliced bars in the SCC beams was slightly lower than that of the NC. The SCC beams exhibited lower reductions in bond strength than the NC beams due to the casting-position effect. In addition, the experimental findings confirm that the top-bar factor of 1.3, recommended in current design codes, can provide adequate safety margins for GFRP-reinforced NC and SCC beams with a splice length of 40db. Furthermore, the threshold depth of 305 mm (12 in.) provided in current design codes and guidelines appears to be reasonably safe.

DOI:

10.14359/51714459


Document: 

18-210

Date: 

March 1, 2019

Author(s):

Basem H. AbdelAleem and Assem A. A. Hassan

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

116

Issue:

2

Abstract:

This investigation aims to study the effect of different types and volumes of synthetic fibers (SFs) on the cyclic behavior of rubberized beam-column joints. Different self-consolidating rubberized concrete (SCRC) mixtures with different percentages of crumb rubber (CR) and SFs were tested. The main parameters were the percentage of CR (0, 15, and 25% by volume of sand), coarse aggregate size (10 and 20 mm [0.39 and 0.79 in.]), concrete type (SCRC and vibrated rubberized concrete), type of SF (microsynthetic fibers [MISFs] and macro-synthetic fibers [MASFs]), length of SFs (19, 27, 38, 50, and 54 mm [0.75, 1.06, 1.5, 1.97, and 2.13 in.]), and volume of SFs in the mixture (0, 0.2, and 1%). The structural performance of the tested beam-column joints was assessed based on load-deflection response, initial stiffness, load-carrying capacity, first cracking load, cracking behavior, failure mode, rate of stiffness degradation, displacement ductility, brittleness index, and energy dissipation. The results indicated that using MISFs slightly improved the structural performance of beam-column joints, while using MASFs had a significant effect on enhancing the load-carrying capacity, ductility, stiffness, and energy dissipation of tested joints. The highest improvement in the cyclic performance of beam-column joints was noticed when 38 mm (1.5 in.) MASFs were used. The results also showed that adding a high percentage of SFs (1%) to joints with a high percentage of CR (25%) compensated for the reduced load-carrying capacity caused by the high percentage of CR and helped to develop the joint with significant improvements in ductility, cracking behavior, brittleness index, first crack load, and energy dissipation.

DOI:

10.14359/51714456


Document: 

17-232

Date: 

May 1, 2018

Author(s):

Shahab Samad, Attaullah Shah, and Mukesh C. Limbachiya

Publication:

Materials Journal

Volume:

115

Issue:

3

Abstract:

Limited research work exists on assessment of punching shear of reinforced concrete (RC) flat slabs made with blended cement incorporating ground-granulated blast-furnace slag (GGBS). This research is aimed at analyzing the punching shear strength of RC flat slabs cast from blended cement having GGBS in different proportions as partial replacement of cement. Four flat slabs supported on the ends were tested under column load such that one flat slab was cast from normal concrete with no GGBS and the remaining three flat slabs were cast with 30, 40, and 50% replacement of cement by GGBS. Experimental punching shear, midspan deflections, strain in the steel bars, and cracking pattern of the slabs were determined. The results of punching shear of flat slabs from the tests were compared with the nominal punching shear capacities proposed by BS 8110, BS EN1992-1-1/EC2, and ACI 318. The provisions of these building codes for the punching shear were observed as safe and conservative for the RC flat slab made from blended cement incorporating GGBS.

DOI:

10.14359/51702012


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