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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 51 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP326-55

Date: 

August 10, 2018

Author(s):

Arne Spelter, Sergej Rempel, Norbert Will, and Josef Hegger

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

326

Abstract:

Textile reinforced concrete (TRC) is a high-performance composite material made of impregnated filaments and a concrete matrix with a longer service life compared to steel reinforced concrete. Due to the non-corrosive reinforcement it is possible to reduce the concrete cover and realize slender and architectural attractive concrete structures. In addition, resources and CO2-emissions can be saved.

Despite the non-corrosive reinforcement, a loss of strength occurs over the service life due to environmental impacts. Therefore, a testing concept is required to determine a reduction factor that takes the loss of strength during the service life into account. This enables a safe design of textile reinforced concrete structures.

A testing concept for TRC is derived from existing concepts for fiber reinforced polymers (FRP). Available concepts (e.g. ACI 440.3R-12, ASTM 7337, CSA S806-12, ISO 10406-1) differentiate between creep rupture and alkaline resistance. Therefore, a test setup was derived which combines the existing concepts and enables the determination of the long-term durability of non-metallically reinforced concrete structures. The long-term durability is defined as a constant stress on a reinforcement that can be applied during the service life without a failure of the reinforcement.


Document: 

SP326-70

Date: 

August 10, 2018

Author(s):

Adriana Angelotti, Sonia Leva, Giulio Zani, and Marco di Prisco

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

326

Abstract:

Sustainability of cement-based construction components is becoming a key point of the structural design process, since the implementation of green strategies favors an overall reduction of economic and environmental impacts. In the framework of a regionally funded research project, an innovative multi-layered roof element for the retrofitting of existing industrial buildings was developed at Politecnico di Milano. The development followed a holistic approach focusing on two main levels: 1) the optimization of the transverse section, aimed at minimizing the employment of cementitious composites such as High Performances Fiber Reinforced Concrete (HPFRC) and Textile Reinforced Concrete (TRC) and 2) the improvement of the energy performances, through the selection of adequate insulating materials (polystyrene and glass foam were considered) and the design of Building-Integrated PhotoVoltaics (BIPV). In this paper, preliminary considerations pertaining to the sectional and structural behavior of a 2.5 × 5 m [8.2 × 16.4 ft.] secondary panel are followed by the numerical/experimental evaluation of the thermal transmittance U and the BIPV performances. In this regard, a small demo roofing system housing three full scale panels was monitored throughout two Summer weeks, leading to the assessment of photovoltaics Performance Ratios (PR) and effectiveness of the architectural integration.


Document: 

SP326-98

Date: 

August 10, 2018

Author(s):

Francesca Albani and Carlo Dusi

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

326

Abstract:

After World War II the research about the double curvature structures in reinforced concrete was a frontier in the field of typological, spatial and expressive innovation. Among the principal leading figures was the swiss engineer Heinz Isler with his methods called “form finding” based on the use of physical modeling to determine the form and subsequently investigate its stability. When a concrete shell is shaped using a hanging-membrane model, it assumes an ideal form using a minimum of materials, with minimal deformations and in compression only. This is only the first step in the process of finding the form. Then one has to do the exact structural analysis, the layout of the reinforcement and prestressing elements, and the detailing, to deal with construction problems, and finally to carefully observe the structure in use.

The need to protect the works of Heinz Isler has slowly been bearing fruit in recent years. This highlights in a very special way the crucial point of the debate on the protection of modern and contemporary architecture: the recognition of their architectural and cultural values, and consequently the difficulties of the institutions responsible for undertaking their preservation.

The paper intends to investigate the case of the Deitingen service station built in 1968-1969 which represents a fortunate phase in this process and shows how the factors linked to the durability of structures play a small role in the decision-making processes regarding the future of these works. The key role is played by the significance and values that acquires (or loses) over time.


Document: 

SP316

Date: 

April 13, 2017

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

316

Abstract:

Editor: Yail J. Kim and Nien-Yin Chang

Soil-structure interaction has been of interest over several decades; however, many challenging issues remain. Because all structural systems are founded on soil strata, transient and long-term foundation displacements, particularly differential settlement, can severely influence the behavior of structural members in buildings and bridges. This is particularly important when a structure is constructed in earthquake-prone areas or unstable soil regions. Adequate subsurface investigation, design, and construction methods are required to avoid various damage types from structural and architectural perspectives. Typical research approaches include laboratory testing and numerical modeling. The results of on-site examinations are often reported. Recent advances in the-state-of-the-art of soil-structure interaction contribute to accomplishing the safe, reliable, and affordable performance of concrete structures. This Special Publication (SP) encompasses nine papers selected from two technical sessions held in the ACI Fall convention at Denver, CO, in Nov. 2015. All manuscripts submitted are reviewed by at least two experts in accordance with the ACI publication policy. The Editors wish to thank all contributing authors and anonymous reviewers for their rigorous efforts. The Editors also gratefully acknowledge Ms. Barbara Coleman at ACI for her knowledgeable guidance.

Note: The individual papers are also available. Please click on the following link to view the papers available, or call 248.848.3800 to order. SP-316


Document: 

SP313

Date: 

March 6, 2017

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

313

Abstract:

Editors: Kyuichi Maruyama and Andrew W. Taylor

The First American Concrete Institute (ACI) and Japan Concrete Institute (JCI) joint seminar was conceived as a vehicle for promoting collaboration and cooperation between two organizations that are dedicated to the global advancement of concrete technology. In September 2012 ACI President James Wight, and ACI Executive Vice President Ronald Burg, visited the headquarters of JCI and discussed ways to promote collaboration between ACI and JCI with JCI President Taketo Uomoto and JCI Executive Directors. A joint ACI and JCI technical seminar was proposed as a way to share knowledge and foster collaboration between the two organizations. Subsequent discussions between Ronald Burg and JCI Executive Director Kyuichi Maruyama led to a joint seminar planning meeting, held at the ACI convention in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in April 2013.

This volume contains the technical papers presented at the First ACI & JCI Joint Seminar, held in Waimea, Island of Hawaii, Hawaii, July 16 to 18, 2014. The theme of the joint seminar was “Design of Concrete Structures Against Earthquake and Tsunami Disasters.” Five papers were presented by authors from ACI, and five papers from JCI. Three papers are related to tsunami loads and structural design requirements, and seven are related to seismic analysis and design.

The three papers on tsunami effects included a summary by Nakano of structural design requirements for tsunami evacuation buildings in Japan; an overview by Chock of the new tsunami load and design requirements in the United States; and a study by Maruyama et al. on the evaluation of tsunami forces acting on bridge girders.

The seven papers on seismic effects addressed topics ranging from seismic design standards to innovative methods of construction for seismic retrofit. Parra-Montesinos et al. presented the results of experiments on fiber-reinforced coupling beams, as well as design guidelines. Teshigawara discussed JCI contributions to the ISO Standard for seismic evaluation and retrofit of existing concrete structures. A summary of a project on the use of high-strength reinforcement for seismic design was presented by Kelly et al., including findings that are based on extensive prior research on high-strength reinforcement in Japan. Shiohara described the results of a study that supports the new Architectural Institute of Japan (AIJ) Standard for Seismic Capacity Calculation, with a focus on beam-column joints and collapse simulation. Matamoros presented a study of factors that affect drift ratio at axial failure of nonductile reinforced concrete buildings. A study of the seismic response of reinforced concrete bridge piers, including the effects of interaction between piles and soil, was presented by Maki et al. Finally, French et al. discussed an overview of lessons learned from laboratory testing of reinforced concrete shear walls.

The day after the joint seminar a meeting was held between ACI and JCI officials to discuss future collaboration and joint seminars. Representing ACI were President William E. Rushing, and the ACI Executive Vice President, Ronald Burg. Representing JCI were President Hirozo Mihashi, and Chair of the JCI Committee on JCI-ACI Collaboration, Kyuichi Maruyama. It was resolved to hold a second joint seminar, to be hosted by JCI in Tokyo, in conjunction with the 50th anniversary celebrations of the founding of JCI on July 13, 2015. In addition, subsequent discussions between ACI and JCI led to plans for the third joint seminar, to be hosted by ACI at the ACI Convention in Anaheim, California, in October 2017.

It is hoped that this collection of papers will serve to advance the state of analysis and design of concrete structures against earthquakes and tsunamis in both the United States and Japan, and that it will serve as a model for future collaboration between ACI and JCI.

Note: The individual papers are also available. Please click on the following link to view the papers available, or call 248.848.3800 to order. SP-313


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