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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 1336 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP-362_66

Date: 

June 18, 2024

Author(s):

M.T. de Grazia, L.F.M. Sanchez, and A. Leemann

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

362

Abstract:

Using particle packing models (PPMs) in combination with limestone fillers has been shown to be effective in proportioning eco-efficient concrete mixtures with reduced Portland cement content, resulting in suitable performance in fresh and short-term hardened states. However, the decrease in Portland cement and increase in limestone fillers may lower the pH of concrete, raising concerns about durability and long-term performance, potentially leading to increased corrosion of steel reinforcement in the presence of carbonation or chlorides. In this study, the performance of three eco-efficient concrete mixtures with varying cement (250, 200, and 150 kg/m3) and inert filler contents is evaluated against accelerated chloride exposure. The findings highlight the influence of the mixture proportioning and water-to-cement ratio on the resistance to chloride ingress. Ultimately, it is verified that the distance between cement particles is a major contribution towards chloride ingress.

DOI:

10.14359/51742016


Document: 

SP-360_24

Date: 

March 1, 2024

Author(s):

Maria Antonietta Aiello and Luciano Ombres

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

360

Abstract:

The issues related to deformability, strength and ductility of concrete elements reinforced with FRP (Fiber Reinforced Polymer) bars are critically analyzed and discussed in this paper. The analysis is conducted from an experimental point of view by means of bending tests on concrete beams reinforced with Carbon FRP (CFRP) bars with different amounts of reinforcement, and by an analytical approach aiming to evaluate the deflection and cracking phenomenon (number and width of cracks). The experimental results are compared with the analytical predictions and with predictions developed on the basis of the available codes (ACI, EC2, JSCE). The analysis of the results obtained confirms the most relevant issues of the mechanical behavior of FRP bar-reinforced beams, still worthy of research efforts; some technological and construction solutions that can provide significant improvements are also addressed.

DOI:

10.14359/51740636


Document: 

SP-360_22

Date: 

March 1, 2024

Author(s):

Stephanie L. Walkup, Eric S. Musselman, Shawn P. Gross, and Hannah Kalamarides

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

360

Abstract:

Recently codified language in ACI CODE-440.11-22 provides an equation for concrete shear capacity and imposes a lower bound on this calculation. An experimental study consisting of 39 flexural members without shear reinforcement and tested to failure in shear was used to evaluate the current code provisions, including, most specifically, the lower bound. Comparison of experimental and analytical shear capacities demonstrates that the current code provisions are conservative. More lightly reinforced specimens have a higher variability in experimental-to-nominal concrete shear strength than more heavily reinforced specimens, and this variability appears to be dominated by the depth between the elastic cracked section neutral axis and the depth of the tensile reinforcement, which is the area where aggregate interlock occurs. Based on a comparative reliability study, the lower bound, kcr = 0.16 (5kcr = 0.8), in the code, causes more lightly reinforced specimens (kcr < 0.16) to have lower factors of safety against shear failure than more heavily reinforced specimens (kcr > 0.16). Rather than imposing a lower bound of 5kcr on the current shear strength equation, it would be more prudent to resolve the overprediction of the equation for all specimens.

DOI:

10.14359/51740634


Document: 

SP-360_19

Date: 

March 1, 2024

Author(s):

Huifeng Qian, Wendell Harriman II., P.E.

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

360

Abstract:

Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite rebar is a non-metallic concrete reinforcement alternative that has been successfully deployed in hundreds of structural applications globally. The increasing demand for FRP rebar as a metal alternative is driven by its unique value proposition, including lightweight, high strength, magnetic transparency, and most significantly, corrosion resistance. FRP rebar is fabricated through pultrusion, a high throughput composite fabrication process in which, resin-impregnated fiber undergoes rapid cure when pulled through a heated furnace. Considering the open nature of the open pultrusion process, expansion of production capacity for FRP rebar manufacturing demands the use of advanced resins that are free from Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), enable high throughput production, and deliver an outstanding translation of fiber properties following cure. In this work, we will present an epoxy system that is inherently VOC Free and is tailored to enable high throughput manufacturing of glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) rebar at scale. Furthermore, the rapid formation of highly crosslinked structures achieved with this resin system during pultrusion is found to enable outstanding fiber property translation resulting in high modulus (>70 GPa) and corrosion resistance (>80 % tensile strength retention without load) that exceeds existing standards such as ASTM D7957.

DOI:

10.14359/51740631


Document: 

SP-360_08

Date: 

March 1, 2024

Author(s):

Nadia Nassif , M. Talha Junaid, Salah Altoubat, Mohamed Maalej, and Samer Barakat

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

360

Abstract:

Fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) bars can serve as an appropriate substitute for steel rebar due to their lightweight, high strength, and good corrosion resistance. Nevertheless, the long-term success of FRP bars as promising reinforcement in concrete depends on understanding the bond between FRP bars and concrete. ACI 440.1R-15 recommends utilizing CSA S806-12 Annex S ‘‘Test Method for Determining the Bond-Dependent Coefficient of FRP Rods” for estimating the design value of the bond-dependent coefficient (kb). However, this testing method requires a four-point loaded 3.0-meter-long beam with continuous assessment of developed crack width. Due to the complexity of the test, studies were scarce in assessing the factors affecting the kb. Therefore, this study aimed to relate the experimental kb obtained from large-scale testing to a relatively simpler bond strength value, τu , obtained from smaller-scale FRP pull-out test. The relation was established utilizing data collection for both tests from experimental studies. Three machine learning techniques (Ensembled Trees Artificial Neural Network and Gaussian Process Machines) were then applied to mimic and understand the complex bond-behaviour at varying FRP and concrete properties. The results have shown promising relation (R2>0.8) between kb and τu for different surface textures and fibre types.

DOI:

10.14359/51740620


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