International Concrete Abstracts Portal

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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-10 of 25 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP63-24

Date: 

August 1, 1980

Author(s):

L. Bogue Sandberg and Fred W. Beaufait

Publication:

Special Publication

Volume:

63

Abstract:

The results of a study of the behavior of a shear wall stair shaft are summarized. Comparisons are made between deflections of a 1/24 scale Plexiglas model and predicted deflections from beam theory and finite element analyses. Both lateral loads and torsion are considered. Stair system stresses from a finite element analysis of a full scale, concrete prototype of the model are summarized. It is concluded that beam theory tends to over-estimate shear wall stiffness, and than an effort must be made to prevent damage to the stair system from severe shear wall deformations.

10.14359/6667


Document: 

SP63-23

Date: 

August 1, 1980

Author(s):

A. Coull and S. A. Abu El Magd

Publication:

Special Publication

Volume:

63

Abstract:

A simplified method is presented for the analysis of laterally loaded wide-flanged shear wall structures with rigid or flexible joints between web and flange. The flange and web elements may be either of solid or framed construction, the latter being included by replacing the frame panel by an equivalent orthotropic plate in which the shear modulus is chosen to model the racking behaviour of the rigidly-jointed frame. The results obtained are compared both with theoretical values obtained by the finite element and frame methods, and with the results from a series of tests on small-scale plexiglass models. The method gives results which are sufficiently accurate for practical purposes, and enable the degree of shear lag in the flange, the effective width, and the lateral deflection to be estimated rapidly.

10.14359/6666


Document: 

SP63-22

Date: 

August 1, 1980

Author(s):

Y. C. Wong and A. Coull

Publication:

Special Publication

Volume:

63

Abstract:

An influence coefficient method is presented for the analysis of the interaction between laterally loaded walls, of different cross-sectional shapes, and their connecting floor slabs. The results have been tested for both convergence and accuracy against those obtained by the finite element and finite difference technique. The method yields accurate results for both slab stiffness and stresses, with a considerable saving in computer time over the other theoretical analyses.

10.14359/6665


Document: 

SP63-21

Date: 

August 1, 1980

Author(s):

B. Stafford Smith and I. 0. Nwaka

Publication:

Special Publication

Volume:

63

Abstract:

A study is made of the forces and displacements in multi-outrigger tall building structures. Simplified general equations are developed for the restraining moment of the out-riggers, the reduction in drift and the optimum location of the outriggers for maximum drift reduction. The efficiencies of various optimum and evenly spaced outrigger systems are presented. The assumptions used make the method of analysis suitable only for preliminary design guidance; however, some valuable general conclusions relating to the number and location of outriggers are drawn.

10.14359/6664


Document: 

SP63-20

Date: 

August 1, 1980

Author(s):

J. Schwaighofer and W. N. Ho

Publication:

Special Publication

Volume:

63

Abstract:

The equivalent frame method is employed in the elasto-plastic analysis of a perforated core structure which is subjected to uniformly distributed torque over the height of the core. In a step by step approach the sequence of crack formation, and the onset of yielding of the tension steel in the coupling elements and the shear walls is given.

10.14359/6663


Document: 

SP63-19

Date: 

August 1, 1980

Author(s):

Lawrence G. Selna and Wai K. Tso

Publication:

Special Publication

Volume:

63

Abstract:

A five story reinforced concrete building which collapsed during the Mindanao, Philippines Earthquake of August 1976 is studied. The building experienced a twisting motion dur-ing its collapse. The damages to the building are described, and design calculations which consider the twisting are performed. The calculation results show that a number of columns were understrength but that other factors such as reinforcement detailing and material quality influenced the seismic performance of the building.

10.14359/6662


Document: 

SP63-18

Date: 

August 1, 1980

Author(s):

S. A. Freeman, R. M. Czarnecki, and K. K. Honda

Publication:

Special Publication

Volume:

63

Abstract:

The lateral force stiffness characteristics of structures cannot be represented by a single set of modeling assumptions. Measured data obtained from the study of full-sized buildings subjected to various sources of lateral displacements are compared to calculated results based on various modeling assumptions used in determining the stiffness characteristics of structures. Tentative recommendations are presented for use in the lateral force design of reinforced concrete buildings subjected to winds and/or earthquakes. Stiffness properties associated with effective concrete sections, concrete slab participation, and nonstructural materials are discussed. For both wind and earthquake design, it appears that the assumptions that apply to low amplitude motion should be different than the assumptions that apply to high amplitude motion. Therefore, it is recommended that modeling techniques and the cal-culation of stiffness characteristics be based on some form of a two-level approach.

10.14359/6661


Document: 

SP63-17

Date: 

August 1, 1980

Author(s):

Chris D. Poland

Publication:

Special Publication

Volume:

63

Abstract:

Numerous computer analysis techniques for use in the seismic design of reinforced concrete structures are available to the design engineer and are finding general use. Unfortunately, these techniques are not "exact". Rather, they are forced to make a large number of questionable assumptions about earthquake characteristics and building behavior. To the practicing engineer, whose complex structures and structural elements defy symmetry, regularity and simplicity, the valid use of such technique depends on a complete understanding of the analysis limitations and inaccuracies and requires constant review of the results for analysis generated errors. This paper, while presenting a practical analysis application, addresses the serious difficulties and the inherent inaccuracies encountered in applying the most commonly used computer analysis techniques to concrete shear wall buildings. It is based on the actual computer analyses of a variety of middle-rise concrete shear wall buildings performed over the past few years at H. J. Degenkolb & Associates. This paper, while it addresses and identifies the invalid results that can be easily produced, believed and designed for, in concrete shear wall building analysis, also provides usable techniques for identifying, adjusting and correcting the problems that are encountered. As such, it provides the practicing engineer with additional insight and understanding of his computer analysis techniques.

10.14359/6660


Document: 

SP63-16

Date: 

August 1, 1980

Author(s):

Agustin A. Mazzeo

Publication:

Special Publication

Volume:

63

Abstract:

This paper describes the structural earthquake design of a 28 story reinforced concrete Office Building located in Caracas, Venezuela, which is a very heavy seismic area. The structure has special features, such as its cross-shaped plan and four 'U' shaped shearwalls placed at comers of the building. It was designed to resist a total shear at the base of building of .08g, distributed over the height according to its dynamic response. Soil site properties, represented by a measured alluvial deposit 160 meters deep (525 ft.), were considered to select an appropriate response spectrum for the structural design. The structural analysis underlined the excellent behavior of the lateral load resisting system used in this structure. This system consists of longitudinal frames interacting with 'U' shearwalls. The structural system complies with limits on lateral deformations imposed by the Venezuelan Seismic Code MOP-1967 (1). The shearwalls proved to be extremely efficient in limiting lateral deformations and in resisting additional shear forces due to Code requirements in connection with torsion. The Wide column-frame analogy was used to model shearwalls, and the analysis considered full frame-shearwalls interaction, axial strainin all structural elements and infinitely rigid haunches at nodal points of frames in order to take account of the relative effect of the actual dimensions of the structural elements. The design of the shearwalls was achieved by means of ultimate strength computer interaction diagrams for combinations of axial loads and uniaxial bending moments.

10.14359/6659


Document: 

SP63-15

Date: 

August 1, 1980

Author(s):

Thomas Paulay

Publication:

Special Publication

Volume:

63

Abstract:

The concepts of capacity design philosophy, which aims to ensure a desirable sequence in the plastification of ductile frames during severe seismic excitation, are introduced, In the establishment of desirable strength hierarchies the relationship between beam load inputs and ideal column strengths are examined in detail. Simple procedures, that recognise relative strength values and general characteristics of dynamic behavior, are proposed for the evaluation of moments, axial and shear forces for columns of frames. The proposals intend to ensure a high degree of protection against premature damage to columns, and to eliminate the possibility of concentrated energy dissipation in storey mechanisms in frarnes that may be subjected to unidirectional earthquake attack or to concurrent orthogonal seismic excitations. Because hinging is not expected in upper storey columns, the re-quirements for confining reinforcement in the end regions of these columns can be greatly relaxed.

10.14359/6658


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