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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 15 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP268-14

Date: 

March 1, 2010

Author(s):

N. Ozyurt, T. O. Mason, and S. P. Shah

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

268

Abstract:

The effects of fresh state properties on the fiber dispersion characteristics of fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs) were studied by quantifying fiber segregation. Fresh state properties of concrete mixes were varied using different combinations of a plasticizing agent and viscosity modifier. A self-designed parallel-plate rheometer was used to obtain rheological parameters. Vibration was applied to the specimens and vibration times were varied to understand the effects of vibration on fiber segregation. An electrical characterization method, alternating current-impedance spectroscopy (AC-IS), was used to quantify fiber segregation in specimens. The relationship between fresh state properties and fiber segregation was evaluated.

DOI:

10.14359/51663717


Document: 

SP268-13

Date: 

March 1, 2010

Author(s):

C. N. MacDonald

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

268

Abstract:

The case history presented in this paper describes a small sized project for design and construction of a macro synthetic fiber reinforced concrete (SnFRC) residential driveway with an average grade of 17%. The study highlights risks and benefits of choosing this material for this project. Five almost-equal lengths of SnFRC sections were placed in two groups 11 months apart. The delay between placements allowed for some experience to better analyze and determine if this was the best solution given the customer’s performance criteria and the difficult construction conditions. The design included a high cementitious content mixture with small aggregate, synthetic macro fibers, and air-entraining admixture. The resulting driveway was constructed down hill and has performed well in spite of minimal surface preparations and no jointing or saw cuts in the overlay. Some small cracking has occurred but has been of no consequence because the concrete has been held together by the synthetic fibers. For the construction of this residential driveway utilizing synthetic fiber reinforced concrete, the performance criteria was met, the construction schedule was on time, and the construction costs were significantly lower.

DOI:

10.14359/51663716


Document: 

SP268-12

Date: 

March 1, 2010

Author(s):

X. Destree

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

268

Abstract:

The structural use of steel fibers as the only principal reinforcing has been developed and refined for the last 15 years. Total replacement of traditional rebar is now common in applications like suspended slabs resting on a pile grid which spans from 3 m (10 ft) to 5 m (17 ft) each way. Generally, the span-depth ratio of the slabs in such applications ranges from 12 to 25. Although most of these slabs use the ground as a form only, some of them have been cast in elevated conditions without any contact with the ground to ensure total independence in the event expansive clay or gas hazards are present or could be present. More recently, steel fiber reinforced concrete has been used in suspended elevated slabs with a span-depth ratio equal to 30, and spans from 5 to 8 m (17 to 26 ft) length. The present article reviews the concrete mix design, the type of steel fiber, the dosage rate needed, the hardened concrete testing method based on current standard documents and round indeterminate panel slab tests. An example of steel fiber-reinforced concrete elevated slab is given and the design method is outlined in detail.

DOI:

10.14359/51663715


Document: 

SP268-11

Date: 

March 1, 2010

Author(s):

J. Wong and P. D. Carter

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

268

Abstract:

The use of steel fiber-reinforced, silica-fume-modified concrete overlays and shotcrete for bridge repairs has long been the standard for Alberta Transportation (AT). Approximately 200 provincial bridges have been repaired with steel fiber reinforced, silica-fume-modified materials since 1984, mostly to decks, which had been exposed to aggressive conditions including freezing and thawing, de-icing salts, and moisture. The purpose of using steel fiber in bridge concrete repair materials was primarily to prevent or reduce repair cracks and to improve durability. Standard fiber lengths were 25 mm (1 in.) for shotcrete and 50 mm (2 in.) for overlays with standard fiber dosages of 60 km/m3 (100 pounds/yd3). Most of the repairs were done with superplasticized, silica-fume-modified, low water-cement ratio concrete mixes. This paper reports on the early historical development of the repair method basics and the lessons learned from monitoring bridge repairs. Conclusions are presented from AT’s Level 1 and Level 2 inspection data. Level 2 data quantifies several repair performance indicators, such as wide cracks, stains, delamination, spalls, patches, and debonds, as well as a breakdown of numerical condition ratings on important bridge elements. Crack data from Level 2 inspections was available from 154 silica fume modified bridge deck overlays, 124 of which contained steel fiber. The crack data was analyzed to assess the performance of fibers in reducing the amount of easily visible cracks: those wider than 0.3 mm (0.012 in.). The results showed that the steel fibers resulted in significant crack reduction and improved overlay durability and service life.

DOI:

10.14359/51663714


Document: 

SP268-06

Date: 

March 1, 2010

Author(s):

R. I. Bell and J. H. Morton

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

268

Abstract:

This paper discusses the use of alkali resistant cellulose fibers for decorative applications. The penetration of fibrous reinforcement for decorative concrete applications has been somewhat limited. The main barrier has been interference of the fiber during many of the intricate and complicated finishing steps employed in these high-end concrete applications. Some of the complications encountered are fibers sticking to the stamps and dragging out of the surface, fiber clumps found at the surface creating blemishes, lack of stain receptivity by the fibers, etc. These aesthetic complications can often result in customer dissatisfaction with the final product. The commercial entry of alkali resistant cellulose fibers for fibrous reinforcement in concrete has provided a new option for fiber reinforced concrete in decorative concrete applications. The potential benefits of cellulose fibers in concrete are expected to help further enlarge the use of fiber reinforced concrete in the market place.

DOI:

10.14359/51663709


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