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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 11 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP196-08

Date: 

October 1, 2000

Author(s):

S. A. Mirza

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

196

Abstract:

This paper summarizes the assumptions and analyses used for developing the reliability-based design of reinforced concrete flexural and compression members. Based on data on the variability of concrete and reinforcing steel physical and dimensional properties, estimates were made of the variability of strength of reinforced concrete beams and columns. These data, plus statistical descriptions of loadings, were used in a first-order, second-moment probabilistic analysis to compute resistance factors. Two sets of resistance factors for reinforced concrete members subjected to flexure or combined axial load and flexure are discussed: (a) resistance factors compatible with the current American Concrete Institute (ACI) load factors specified in ACI 3 18-95 Section 9.2; and (b) resistance factors compatible with the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Standard 7-95 (ANSI A58-1) load factors included in ACI 3 18-95 Appendix C. This paper provides a direct comparison between the two sets of load and resistance factors that are now part of the ACI 3 18 safety criteria.

DOI:

10.14359/10003


Document: 

SP196-07

Date: 

October 1, 2000

Author(s):

R. W. Furlong

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

196

Abstract:

Steel-concrete composite columns may be designed either by requirements of the American Concrete Institute Building Code AC1 3 18-99 or by the American Institute of Steel Construction Specifications for Load and Resistance Factor Design, 2d Edition (1995). Each design standard is described for application to a concrete filled steel tube and to a concrete encased structural shape as each is designed for the same dimensional and service load conditions. These standard type column sections are used for the comparison, as the LRFD specification can be used directly only for such standard sections. The design exercise demonstrates that a) the LRFD specification requires fewer computational steps and is therefore easier to apply, b) the ACI rules tend to exaggerate the influence of slenderness, and c) different but very similar results were obtained for the two methods applied to the same design problem.

DOI:

10.14359/10001


Document: 

SP196-02

Date: 

October 1, 2000

Author(s):

L. J. Malvar

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

196

Abstract:

were used to upgrade reinforced concrete beams, slabs and piles. GFRP shells were also used for pile upgrade. Some of these components were reinforced and prestressed with CFRP rods and tendons. Finally, other composites, such as epoxy coatings for rebars and engineered wood were addressed. Long term Since 1992, the U.S. Navy, Naval Facilities Engineering Service Since 1992, the U.S. Navy, Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center (NFESC), has been involved in the study and use of advanced fiber Center (NFESC), has been involved in the study and use of advanced fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) composites for its waterfront infrastructure applications. reinforced plastic (FRP) composites for its waterfront infrastructure applications. Carbon FRP (CFRP) and glass (GFRP) composites were assessed and Carbon FRP (CFRP) and glass (GFRP) composites were assessed and demonstrated at NFESC and at various sites throughout the Navy. CFRP sheets demonstrated at NFESC and at various sites throughout the Navy. CFRP sheets were used to upgrade reinforced concrete beams, slabs and piles. GFRP shells were also used for pile upgrade. Some of these components were reinforced and prestressed with CFRP rods and tendons. Finally, other composites, such as epoxy coatings for rebars and engineered wood were addressed. Long term durability issues are still being investigated. This paper represents an overview of the assessment and use of FRP materials in Navy reinforced concrete waterfront structures. durability issues are still being investigated. This paper represents an overview of the assessment and use of FRP materials in Navy reinforced concrete waterfront structures.

DOI:

10.14359/9996


Document: 

SP196-01

Date: 

October 1, 2000

Author(s):

A. Elremaily and A. Azizinamini

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

196

Abstract:

The Through beam connection detail has been identified as an ideal rigid connection for attaching steel beams to concrete filled tube (CFT) columns. A combination of analytical and experimental studies is being conducted to comprehend the behavior of this detail. The test specimen consisted of a CFT column and a steel beam passed through the column to represent an interior joint in a building. This paper presents a summary of the finite element analysis that was conducted to comprehend the force transfer mechanism and identify locations of potential stress concentration. The analytical results were verified by comparison with the experimental results. Both the experimental and analytical results showed the capability of the connection to develop the full plastic bending strength of the connected beam. The elements that contribute to the connection strength were identified as: the beam web, the steel tube, and the concrete core.

DOI:

10.14359/9995


Document: 

SP196-06

Date: 

October 1, 2000

Author(s):

H. Kuramoto and I. Nishiyama

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

196

Abstract:

The building standard law of Japan was largely revised in June 1998. With the revision, the adoption of the capacity spectrum method (CSM) for the seismic design procedure is being considered toward the enforcement in June 2000. In the CSM, the estimation of the demand spectrum is one of important issues, because the damping properties of a building should be appropriately considered. The equivalent damping factor of composite RCS buildings consisting of steel beams and reinforced concrete columns is investigated in this paper. The relations between the equivalent damping factor and story drift of RCS joints and frames, which have different joint detail and failure mode, are examined using the existing test results including those obtained in the US-Japan cooperative research program on composite and hybrid structures. It is indicated that the influence of the hysteretic damping of beam-column joints can not be ignored for estimating the equivalent damping factor of composite RCS buildings particularly when the strength and stiffness of joints are relatively small.

DOI:

10.14359/9999


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