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International Concrete Abstracts Portal

Showing 1-5 of 11 Abstracts search results

Document: 

SP152-08

Date: 

March 1, 1995

Author(s):

C. N. Baker, Jr.

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

152

Abstract:

Describes three innovative mat foundation designs and the close interaction required between the structural engineer and the geotechnical engineer. The significance of load deformation prediction reliability in the three different soil profiles is illustrated. The cases reviewed include a three-story office building with single basement build on a mat over peat; a 26-story apartment building with basement built on a modified mat in a thin dense sand stratum over soft clay; and a 19-story hotel with two basements built on a mat in a sand layer over medium clay. The mat of the 19-story hotel was supplemented with selective high capacity piles at the column locations designed to ultimate soil capacity at working loads and utilized to reduce both mat settlement and design mat thickness. The instrumentation used to confirm design assumptions in the three cases is briefly described.

DOI:

10.14359/1525


Document: 

SP152-06

Date: 

March 1, 1995

Author(s):

G. J. Tamaro and A. H. Brand

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

152

Abstract:

The MesseTurm, the tower at the fairground in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, is Europe's tallest high-rise building. It is 256 m (840 ft) tall and rests on a combination mat and bored pile foundation bearing in Frankfurt clay. This paper describes the foundation design and construction. Load and settlement monitoring devices were installed; the measurement results obtained during and after construction are presented. The effect of a post-construction 12-m (40-ft) groundwater lowering on the behavior of the foundations is shown.

DOI:

10.14359/1557


Document: 

SP152-10

Date: 

March 1, 1995

Author(s):

J. P. Stewart, K. H. Pitulej, and H. S. Lacy

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

152

Abstract:

Describes the design of a load-compensated mat foundation on highly compressible soil. The mat was used to support over 800,000 square feet of variable height building. While the design of the mat was mostly routine, the behavior at the mat edges was difficult to determine. The deformations at mat edges were the major concern since they were influenced by the need to raise grades around the building perimeter. The design procedure incorporated soil-structure interaction analysis to determine the extent of lightweight fill zones required to control edge deformations. Settlement monitoring over a period of two years has confirmed the design approach.

DOI:

10.14359/1529


Document: 

SP152-03

Date: 

March 1, 1995

Author(s):

J. F. Horvilleur and V. B. Patel

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

152

Abstract:

Reviews methods used in preliminary design of mat foundations, as well as procedures used in final analysis and design. Emphasis is placed on the effect that different structural and soil properties have on mat design bending moments and pressure distribution. Using results of parametric studies on two actual mat foundations, the sensitivity of mat moments and pressure distribution to changes in design parameters is investigated. The soil-dishing phenomena and its effect on mat structural design is discussed. The effect that superstructure stiffness has on mat behavior and the effect that differential settlement within the mat has in the superstructure are also presented and discussed. Finally, specific recommendations are provided regarding selection of proper structural and soil properties to be used in analysis and design of foundation mats.

DOI:

10.14359/1522


Document: 

SP152-05

Date: 

March 1, 1995

Author(s):

J. S. Horvath

Publication:

Symposium Papers

Volume:

152

Abstract:

Two mat foundations supporting buildings were analyzed using traditional methods for modeling soil subgrades, as well as more recently developed methods. The primary purpose of the analysis was to evaluate the relative and absolute accuracy of subgrade models that can be used in routine practice. The results indicate that some of the newer methods consistently provide significantly better agreement between calculated and observed behavior compared to the traditional methods. In addition, determination of the appropriate subgrade parameters is more rational with the newer methods. With current computer analysis capabilities, there is no reason to continue use of traditional methods that were reasonable alternatives when only manual calculations could be performed. Detailed recommendations for modeling subgrades in practice are presented, with consideration given to the capabilities of commercially available structural analysis computer software. Other factors that influence mat behavior, such as superstructure interaction effects, are also discussed.

DOI:

10.14359/1434


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