Evaluation of Flexural and Shear Stiffness of Concrete Squat Walls Reinforced with Glass Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Bars

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Title: Evaluation of Flexural and Shear Stiffness of Concrete Squat Walls Reinforced with Glass Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Bars

Author(s): Ahmed Arafa, Ahmed Sabry Farghaly, and Brahim Benmokrane

Publication: Structural Journal

Volume: 115

Issue: 01

Appears on pages(s): 211-221

Keywords: concrete squat walls; flexural and shear deformations; glass fiber-reinforced polymer bars; seismic resistance; stiffness

Date: 1/1/2018

Abstract:
Estimating the flexural and shear stiffness of concrete squat walls reinforced with glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars is important to evaluate lateral displacement. To address this issue, five full-scale concrete squat walls, including four reinforced with GFRP bars and one reinforced with steel bars, were tested to failure under quasi-static reversed cyclic lateral loading. Decoupling flexural and shear deformations of the tested specimens showed the contribution of shear deformation to the lateral displacement. The shear stiffness of the cracked wall can be estimated based on the truss model with an acceptable level of conservatism. The shearcrack angle and concrete shear strength were evaluated. The flexural stiffness was estimated based on available expressions in codes and guidelines related to the design of concrete members reinforced with fiber-reinforced polymer bars, demonstrating their adequacy with walls although they were established for beam and slab elements. Based on regression analyses of the test results, expressions that correlate flexural and shear stiffness to lateral drift were proposed. Such expressions would be vital in the context of displacement-based design.