Sessions & Events

 

Please note: All sessions and events take place in Central Daylight Time: CDT (UTC-5).

H=Hyatt Regency Dallas; U=Union Station

Don’t Mess with Texas Concrete – A Historical Perspective of the Concrete Industry

Sunday, October 23, 2022  3:30 PM - 5:30 PM, H-Reunion C

The main objective of this session is to present a broad perspective on the important issues related to historical structures.

Included in the session are the following presentations:
- Kanh's Concrete: Kimball Art Museum and Salk Institute
- A Street and a Superhighway: Two Pioneering Concrete Pavements in Texas
- SS Selma: The Rise and Fall of an Experimental Concrete Ship
- Concrete Protects - Resilient Galveston Seawall
- Historic Shortage of Poly-Iso Insulation: Do We Really Need it? A Presentation of Case Studies of Lightweight Insulating Concrete (LWIC)

Learning Objectives:
(1) Distinguish some of the historical concrete structures;
(2) Name some of the significant people in the concrete industry;
(3) Recognize some of the notable achievements of the concrete organizations;
(4) Identify a few of the Texas concrete Landmarks.

This session has been AIA/ICC approved for 2 CEU/PDH credits.


Kanh's Concrete: Kimball Art Museum and Salk Institute

Presented By: Ann Harrer
Affiliation: Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Inc.
Description: The Kimbell Art Museum in Fort Worth, Texas, is renowned for its collection of antiquities and notable art from around the globe. The Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, California, is recognized internationally for the pioneering science conducted there. What they have in common is that both structures were designed by Louis I. Khan, and they are both iconic examples of modern architecture. The buildings prominently feature exposed reinforced concrete. The stewards of both buildings have undertaken projects to assess and develop approaches to conserve, repair, and maintain the reinforced concrete. Using these two modern icons as points of reference, the presentation will discuss how to develop appropriate conservation efforts for inspiring examples of architecture featuring reinforced concrete. A conservation program begins by identifying the significant aesthetic-defining characteristics. Critical steps in the development of a repair approach include consideration of the materiality and craftsmanship that contribute to each building’s unique sense of place. The ongoing concrete repair project at the Salk Institute will be presented, as well as a brief discussion of the early stages of the conservation project at the Kimbell Art Museum.


A Super Street and a Superhighway: Two Pioneering Concrete Pavements in Texas

Presented By: Kurt Smith
Affiliation: Applied Pavement Technology, Inc.
Description: Concrete pavements are a mainstay of roadway construction in Texas, and the State can point to a number of innovative concrete pavements that helped establish concrete as a material of choice for durable, long-lasting roadways. Two projects of particular interest include: • The Blome Granitoid Concrete Pavement located on Belknap Place in San Antonio, which was built in 1914. Featuring two-course construction (with a thicker lower layer of lean concrete and a thin upper layer of richer concrete forming the wearing surface), the project demonstrated the durability of concrete and remains in service today. • The State’s first continuously reinforced concrete pavement (CRCP) located on the North-South Freeway (now I-35) in Fort Worth, which was constructed in 1951. The project featured an 8-inch slab on an 8-inch crushed stone base and a longitudinal steel content of 0.7%. The project was in service for 40 years and demonstrated that CRCP can provide excellent performance and paved the way for Texas to become a leader in CRCP design and construction. This presentation highlights some of the characteristics of both of these concrete pavement projects and describes the impacts that they made on concrete pavement practices in Texas.


SS Selma: The Rise and Fall of an Experimental Concrete Ship

Presented By: Jacob Borgerson
Affiliation: Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Inc.
Description: Steel shortages during World War I led the US to build experimental concrete ships, the largest of which was the SS Selma. The ship was launched on June 28, 1919, the same day Germany signed the Treaty of Versailles, officially ending World War I. As a result, the 7,500-ton ship never served during the war. Instead, she was placed into service as an oil tanker in the Gulf of Mexico. Approximately one year later, the SS Selma wrecked and ripped a 60-foot hole in her hull. Today, the SS Selma is partially submerged in Galveston Bay and is visible from the Houston Ship Channel. Long a source of curiosity and local legend, it remains important to understanding the historical aspects of concrete construction.


Historic Shortage of Poly-Iso Insulation: Do We Really Need it? A Presentation of Case Studies of Lightweight Insulating Concrete (LWIC)

Presented By: Trevor Towery
Affiliation: Elastizell Corp. of America
Description: Due to the many material shortages experienced during and post pandemic, the shortage of poly-iso insulation board has impacted the construction industry. This is the most common type of roof insulation installed on flat roof buildings like hotels, convention centers and schools. The alternative roof insulation is a system using cellular concrete or LWIC and expanded polystyrene offer a solution for a market in need. A series of case histories of installation across Texas dating back to the early 1990s will be discussed: Galveston County Correctional Facility, Cy-Fair School District, George R Brown Convention Center and the Dallas Convention Center.

Upper Level Sponsors

Ash Grove
Baker
Conseal
Controls Group
Euclid Chemical
GCP
Master Builders
PoreShield
PS=0
ACI Northeast Texas Chapter

Please enter this 5 digit unlock code on the web page.