Sessions and Events

Sessions & Events 

GA = Grand America; LA = Little America

 

Convention Highlights

March 27, 2018


6:00 AM - 6:45 AM

Interested in putting a little balance into your hectic week? Whether you have regularly practiced yoga or have never tried it, this session will help you get your body and mind grounded for the day and week ahead. Led by yoga teacher Kimberly Kayler, this intro to yoga class requires no experience. You don't have to be able to twist into a pretzel or even touch your toes! Registration is not required and yoga mats will be provided.

*Please consult with your physician to determine if you are fit for this type of activity.


8:30 AM - 10:30 AM

Moderator: Yail Jimmy Kim

The special sessions will emphasize recent advances in concrete bridges, including design, construction, and rehabilitation. Presentations will encompass a variety of technical aspects such as the innovative design methods of bridge structures, accelerated bridge construction, damage detection and assessment techniques, and strengthening of deteriorated bridge members. Both experimental and analytical investigations are of interest. The sessions bring to light recent research findings and provide an opportunity to discuss present challenges and technical demands. Critical information is given to those who lead tomorrow’s bridge design and construction, including practicing engineers, government officials, and academics. An ACI Special Publication will be published.
Learning Objectives:
(1) Recognize the state-of-the-art of concrete bridges.
(2) Identify research needs to advance the knowledge associated with concrete bridges.
(3) Recognize the effort to establish a new trend in the design and construction of sustainable concrete bridges.
(4) Link laboratory investigations with practical site applications.


8:30 AM - 10:30 AM

On December 17, 2010 a fire destroyed the pioneer era Provo Tabernacle, leaving only a portion of the exterior walls remaining. On October 1, 2011, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints announced that the tabernacle would be restored and converted into a temple. Thus began the very technically challenging effort to create the Provo City Center Temple. This presentation will discuss the history of the structure, the fire, cleanup efforts, shoring, ground water management, waterproofing, wall strengthening and restoration, as well as the beauty that was created inside and outside. This presentation will be given through the eyes of the Church project manager, the structural engineer, and the contractor. This session will be presented as a panel discussion, discussing the process from beginning to end. Panelist will be:
• History and Efforts of Restoration – Andy Kirby, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
• Engineering; Reinforced Concrete and Masonry – Jesse Malan, Reaveley Engineers + Associates
• Construction – John Emery and Mark Robins, Jacobsen Construction
Learning Objectives:
(1) How to support the historic walls of an existing building and excavate a 40-foot deep basement below the existing foundation.
(2) How to preserve pioneer era unreinforced brick masonry walls and make them structurally sound to last another 100 years.
(3) How to construct a water-tight structure 17 feet below the site water table and prevent buoyancy forces from lifting it out of the ground.
(4) The benefits of owner/architect/contractor/subcontractor/engineer collaboration.

Attendees will earn 2 ICC Preferred Provider Credit Hours and 2 State of Utah Contractor Core Credit Hours.


8:30 AM - 9:30 AM

Moderator: Robert E Sculthorpe

Inform attendees of: Winter construction of multi-story university student residences using ICF walls and precast hollow core concrete floors, taking advantage of the insulating properties of ICFs. Learning of the benefit of speed of construction when building multi-story buildings with ICF walls and precast hollow core concrete floors. Examples of buildings up to 22 stories built with ICF walls and precast hollow core concrete floors demonstrating the benefits of this type of concrete construction. Thermal performance of ICF walls in comparison with wood frame walls.
Learning Objectives:
(1) Compare speed of construction for multi-story buildings constructed with ICF walls and hollow core precast concrete floors.
(2) Describe successful winter construction of multi-story buildings constructed with ICF walls and hollow core precast concrete floors.
(3) Summarize benefits to owners and occupants of student residences constructed with ICF walls.
(4) Identify tested thermal properties of ICF walls in comparison with wood frame walls.


8:30 AM - 10:30 AM

Moderator: Matthew O'Reilly

racking is often considered detrimental to the corrosion resistance of reinforced concrete structures, but the magnitude of this effect is less clear. Crack size, location, and depth all may affect the impact of cracking on corrosion, and there is debate as to whether small cracks are detrimental to corrosion resistance. Presentations will highlight recent research into the effect of cracking on corrosion resistance of concrete and the effectiveness of crack mitigation/repair. This session will be of interest to contractors, engineers, and owners who wish to learn how cracking can impact the service life of structures they design, build, and use.
Learning Objectives:
(1) Recognize the influence different types of cracking have on corrosion initiation and propagation in reinforced concrete.
(2) Determine the impact cracking has on remaining service life of a structure.
(3) Understand the effect of design variables, such as concrete cover, w/cm ratio, and the use of supplementary cementitious materials, on the relationship between cracking and corrosion.
(4) Understand case studies and repair techniques to mitigate corrosion in cracked concrete.


9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

$22.00

As Utah’s most prominent landmark, the Capitol has been home to the State of Utah’s government for over a century. In 2008, the Utah State Capitol underwent a major seismic retrofit. Installation of 265 base isolators for the 90+ year old Capitol required a complete removal of the existing foundation, leading to an ingenious method of a load transfer system. In addition to the base isolation, existing columns, walls, and the dome were reinforced, making the structure stronger in the effect of an earthquake. Tours of the Capitol and viewing of the isolation system are available to approved groups. There is no restriction on who can enter the Capitol Building.


11:00 AM - 1:00 PM

Moderators: Mohamed ElBatanouny, Frederick D Heidbrink

The objective of these sessions is to present and discuss different approaches to analyze and reduce data from structural health monitoring systems especially in field settings. The focus is how to translate SHM data into useful information that can be used by engineers and owners to: understand the current condition of the monitored structure, prediction of remaining service life and damage prognosis, and maintenance scheduling and prioritization, if applicable. These sessions will be of interest to engineers, researchers, and infrastructure owners and operators.
Learning Objectives:
(1) Understand how SHM technologies can be used to monitor reinforced and prestressed concrete structures and elements under field as well as laboratory conditions.
(2) Review analysis and interpretation techniques for SHM data.
(3) Identify the challenges related to the management of ‘big data’ associated with SHM.
(4) Understand the relationship between collected data and how it can be used to assess the condition of the monitored structure.


11:00 AM - 1:00 PM

This session applies to all audiences globally. All audiences will benefit from attending this session on New Innovations in Chemical Admixtures. Chemical Admixtures is one of the fastest growing and innovative areas of concrete construction currently.
Learning Objectives:
(1) Highlight new admixture technology.
(2) Describe how these new admixtures bring value to concrete by improving plastic and hardened properties, providing improved economy and changing the limits on how concrete can be used as a constructable material.
(3) Discuss knowledge about chemical admixtures.
(4) Summarize how and where to use chemical admixtures effectively.


11:00 AM - 1:00 PM

Moderator: Rouzbeh Khajehdehi

Settlement of concrete is a phenomenon that takes place during the early hours after concrete is cast. This can be a problem in structures having top bars where the settlement of the fresh concrete around the reinforcement can cause cracking and/or a weak plane right above the reinforcement. This session includes presentations providing explanations from research studies and actual projects on the topic of concrete settlement, tests methods developed to measure this phenomenon, and techniques available to reduce it.
Learning Objectives:
(1) Summarize theories explaining the settlement of concrete.
(2) Recognize tests to measure the settlement or settlement cracking of concrete.
(3) Describe examples from real projects and lessons learned.
(4) Identify factors affecting settlement and techniques to reduce it.


11:30 AM - 1:30 PM

$54.00

Join other ACI attendees and contractors for the Contractors’ Day Lunch. With his engaging and entertaining style, Matt Townsend teaches what he has learned over the last 20 years as a leadership consultant and relationship coach, working with thousands of corporate clients. His funny yet universal stories teach how his principles apply to everyday life, no matter your life situation. He will also leave you with the tools and skills necessary to take his concepts and immediately apply them into your real management and day-to-day experiences.
PREREGISTRATION IS REQUIRED TO ATTEND. Tickets may be purchased at the ACI Registration Desk up to 24 hours prior to the event for $64, based on availability. Please notify the ACI Registration Desk if you have any dietary restrictions.


1:30 PM - 2:30 PM

Moderator: Ganesh Thiagarajan

The objective of the session is to discuss and demonstrate the usage of advanced finite element techniques in the analysis and design of reinforced concrete nuclear structures. Presentations will include the challenges faced in applying finite element methods and the solutions devised to enable the usage of the analysis results in design of such structures.
Learning Objectives:
(1) Provide researchers and practitioners with general principles of using finite element methods for the analysis of reinforced concrete nuclear structures.
(2) Provide guidance in the tools that are being developed to make the results from standard finite element programs for design purposes.
(3) Describe the challenges faced by practitioners in using finite element methods in the analysis of reinforced concrete nuclear structures and provide possible solutions.
(4) Describe proven methods in the application of finite element methods in the design of reinforced concrete nuclear structures.


1:30 PM - 3:30 PM

Moderator: Giovanni Loreto

Open Topic Presentation is a forum for presenting recent technical information that could not be scheduled
into other convention sessions.
Learning Objectives:
(1) Recognize new and emerging materials for civil infrastructures;
(2) Demonstrate the various methods to assess the current conditions of structure and how to repair them;
(3) Identify recent techniques, research methods, and procedures related to the structural material aspects of
concrete; and
(4) Explain the behavior of various high-performance cementitious composites.


1:30 PM - 3:30 PM

Moderator: Michelle E Walters

The importance of quality and quality standards include reference to ISO 9001. Beyond the technical aspects, the practice of quality management is about people, relationships, and processes that can have a huge impact on results. Where does one find this type of content, and who will be so bold as to start this discussion? These topics are discussed in many committee meetings where of the most passionate debates revolve around them and how industry stakeholders work together. The concrete industry will benefit from a healthy discussion in a public forum on QMS implementation. The hosting of various speakers, topics, and perspectives will help to engage subject matter experts, highlight practices, and impact other committee documents.
Learning Objectives:
(1) To discuss with the industry the application of quality techniques to various concrete practices.
(2) Understand the pros and cons of quality controls, the benefits and a discussion of the cost of quality.
(3) Highlight examples of quality programs in various sectors of the concrete industry.
(4) To discuss the on-going work of the committee’s document to touch on the diverse range of quality styles and applications.


1:40 PM - 4:00 PM

$20.00

Constructed on 36 acres in Salt Lake City, the Bishops’ Central Storehouse can hold 65,000 pallets of food and supplies that are distributed to over 110 storehouses in the United States, Canada, and internationally. The 540,000 ft2 facility includes the storage warehouse, and 63,000 ft2 of freezer, refrigerator, and cold dock space, offices, transportation center, tire storage, and a fire pump house. More than 40,000 yd3 of concrete was used to build the facility. The structure and its mechanical, electrical, and fire protection systems were designed to allow the facility to be occupied immediately following the maximum considered earthquake ground motion. Please note: this tour requires a significant amount of walking.


2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

While the use of drones and laser scanners isn’t new, changes in technology have made both items more flexible and accessible. Learn how drones and lasers are being used in increasingly innovative ways. Drones aren’t just for “fly-bys” anymore. Drones provide access to previously inaccessible areas and are not limited to the sky; they also swim. As the cost of laser scanning declines, new uses are constantly being discovered. Laser scanners can measure as-built tolerances with a high degree of accuracy.


4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

A presentation addressing common specified requirements for as-cast, architectural, smooth-rubbed, and grout-cleaned rubbed finishes, as well as as-cast surface defects and anomalies, including honeycomb, air voids or bugholes, sand streaking, and offsets. The presentation will also address construction, forming, mixture design, transportation, and engineering challenges faced in extreme conditions.
• As-Cast Concrete Surface Finishes: Specifications, Defects and Repairs – Kim D. Basham, KB Engineering
• Overcoming Challenges in Concrete Construction – Jon Brinkerhoff, Layton Construction, and Sam Koceja, Altaview Concrete
Learning Objectives:
(1) Review specifications and ACI 301 to understand as-cast surface finish requirements
(2) Develop a plan to manage owner’s expectations
(3) Know how to minimize honeycomb, bug holes and sand streaks, as well as determine what surface blemishes require repair
(4) Understand timing, scheduling and safe delivery of concrete in challenging construction sites


Attendees will earn 2 ICC Preferred Provider Credit Hours and 2 State of Utah Contractor Core Credit Hours.


4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

Moderator: Giovanni Loreto

Open Topic Presentation is a forum for presenting recent technical information that could not be scheduled
into other convention sessions.
Learning Objectives:
(1) Recognize new and emerging materials for civil infrastructures;
(2) Demonstrate the various methods to assess the current conditions of structure and how to repair them;
(3) Identify recent techniques, research methods, and procedures related to the structural material aspects of
concrete; and
(4) Explain the behavior of various high-performance cementitious composites.


4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

Moderator: Michelle E Walters

The importance of quality and quality standards include reference to ISO 9001. Beyond the technical aspects, the practice of quality management is about people, relationships, and processes that can have a huge impact on results. Where does one find this type of content, and who will be so bold as to start this discussion? These topics are discussed in many committee meetings where of the most passionate debates revolve around them and how industry stakeholders work together. The concrete industry will benefit from a healthy discussion in a public forum on QMS implementation. The hosting of various speakers, topics, and perspectives will help to engage subject matter experts, highlight practices, and impact other committee documents.
Learning Objectives:
(1) To discuss with the industry the application of quality techniques to various concrete practices.
(2) Understand the pros and cons of quality controls, the benefits and a discussion of the cost of quality.
(3) Highlight examples of quality programs in various sectors of the concrete industry.
(4) To discuss the on-going work of the committee’s document to touch on the diverse range of quality styles and applications.


5:30 PM - 6:30 PM

Faculty members and students are invited to attend this informal reception for an opportunity to exchange ideas and network. Light hors d'oeuvres and a cash bar will be available.


6:30 PM - 8:00 PM

Join ACI attendees and guests for an evening of networking, entertainment, and great food during the Concrete Mixer. An assortment of food and beverages will be available.