Sessions and Events

Sessions & Events 

GA = Grand America; LA = Little America

 

Convention Highlights

March 26, 2018


6:30 AM - 8:00 AM

ACI technical committee Chairs are expected to attend this breakfast workshop to meet with fellow Chairs, TAC members, and ACI staff to hear updates on important recent developments of interest to ACI technical committee Chairs. There will be table discussions and short presentations. If you are unable to attend, please ask the Secretary of your committee or another committee member to represent you in your absence. Attendance is by invitation only.


7:00 AM - 8:30 AM

Moderator: Arsenio Caceres-Fernandez


8:30 AM - 10:30 AM

Internal curing has proven effective in mitigating autogenous shrinkage cracking in cementitious materials. Since cracking strongly compromises the service life of cementitious materials, internal curing provides significant contributions to the durability of infrastructure. There have been significant advancements in fundamental and applied research in the internal curing methods in the last two decades. The objective of this session is to bring together researchers, material suppliers, and contractors to discuss the recent developments in the internal curing technology. Abstracts that provide fundamental or practical contributions are invited. Learning Objectives: (1) Increase awareness about the importance of internal curing in concrete durability. (2) Provide a forum for exchange of ideas related to internal curing. (3) Foster future sessions on innovative methods for internal curing. (4) Enhance the multidisciplinary aspect of innovative cement and concrete research.


8:30 AM - 10:30 AM

The ACI 370 and ACI 440F committees are jointly developing the standard "Blast Design Guidelines for Externally Bonded FRP Applications" to provide guidance for designing concrete and masonry wall panels with an application of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) that are subject to blast loading. The opening presentations in this two-part session will provide an overview of the proposed standard, while covering some basic blast design practices and introducing the underlying single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) analysis methodology. Subsequent presentations will discuss alternate slab analysis approaches, as well as FRPs used as column reinforcement, catching systems, and anchors within a blast and/or impact resistant design. Focused talks on FRP detailing and FRP manufacturer’s insights will also be presented. The attendees to this two-part session will: (1) Learn about the in-progress standard "Blast Design Guidelines for Externally Bonded FRP Applications" and its underlying methodologies. (2) Be introduced to basic blast design practices including dynamic effects, acceptable limit states, response criteria, and detailing requirements that may differ from those used in conventional slab and FRP design. (3) Become familiar with how various slab modeling approaches compare with available test data. (4) Be exposed to FRP blast and impact resistant applications for non-slab geometries such as columns, box sections, and catching systems.


8:30 AM - 9:30 AM

This mini-session will help researchers and professional engineers and architects strengthen their knowledge on non-linear fracture mechanics and size effect. The learning objectives are: (1) Understand the basic concepts of fracture mechanics and how it could affect the current design approaches; (2) Understand the differences between linear elastic fracture mechanics and fracture mechanics of quasi-brittle materials such as concrete; (3) Understand what size effect means and what the sources of size effect are; (4) Understand the role of size effect in the design of reinforced concrete structures


8:30 AM - 10:30 AM


9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

$21.00

The Conference Center is one of the largest theater style auditoriums in the world, with seats for approximately 21,000 people. The steel roof trusses span up to 290 feet, and are supported on one end by a massive 30 foot deep and 152 foot long transfer truss over the stage. These trusses support a garden roof complete with fountains, granite walkways, and trees. The 100-foot cantilever balcony sits above the seating below. The 1.4 million square foot complex is located across the street from the Temple Square. The Salt Lake Tabernacle is home to the world-renowned Mormon Tabernacle Choir. It was constructed between 1864 and 1867. Between 2005 and 2007 the tabernacle was closed for extensive seismic upgrading and renovations. A technical presentation regarding the engineering and construction aspects of these two buildings will be given prior to breaking into smaller groups for a tour of both facilities. Tennis shoes are recommended for this tour as there is extensive walking.


10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Moderator: Brock D Hedegaard

Attendees of this session will learn (1) about the creep and shrinkage properties of self-consolidating concrete, explored using experimental results and the World Database. Attendees will also (2) learn about creep and shrinkage in composite systems, whether structural systems such as composite floor slabs, or material systems such as fiber-reinforced concrete. Attendees will (3) observe differences in various creep and shrinkage design models with respect to experimental observations of time-dependent behavior of SCC both with and without steel and synthetic fiber reinforcement. Attendees will (4) recognize shrinkage gradients through the depth of concrete-steel composite floor slabs, and how these impact time-dependent deformations and stresses. Attendees will be introduced to the Global Database for creep and shrinkage and how to use this for querying creep and shrinkage experimental data for specific concretes.


10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Aggregate particle packing for optimizing concrete mixture proportioning can be a daunting subject. This session will attempt to explain the latest in particle packing without being overwhelming. Attendees will learn (1) both the basics of particle packing as well as the concepts behind current research. (2) Particle packing helps minimize aggregate voids to reduce water and paste demands. (3) Many current particle packing models assume spherical particles. (4) Maximum density aggregates may not be best for the concrete. ACI 211 b/bo is a form of particle packing.


10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

The objective of this session is to provide a greater opportunity for undergraduate students to present their research at a national meeting. This session will focus on research conducted predominately by undergraduate students. It is expected that this session will draw a new group of students to ACI and the convention. It will also allow students to hear presentations of a slightly less technical nature that are more in keeping with their current level of knowledge regarding concrete. Become familiar with the quality and breadth of research being conducted by undergraduate students across the globe. Learn about cutting edge research that is in its infancy as undergraduate students conduct pilot studies and plan for graduate research. Connect with talented undergraduate students who are seeking employment opportunities, graduate school positions, and professional mentors. Learn about the topics included in the session.


10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Moderator: Jan Vosahlik


11:00 AM - 1:00 PM

Accelerated bridge construction (ABC) heavily relies on prefabricated reinforced concrete elements. However, the integrity of a bridge incorporating prefabricated elements depends on the performance of connections under service, strength, and extreme limit state loads. New substructure and superstructure ABC connections are emerging to maximize the speed of construction and to reduce onsite activities. The main objectives of this session are to (1) introduce emerging and proof tested ABC connections for both sub- and super-structures using conventional and advanced materials, (2) familiarize the audience with bridge component and system behavior incorporating these connections, and (3) summarize design and construction guidelines for ABC connections. (4) ABC connections suitable for non-seismic to high-seismic regions are included in the session. Structural engineers, States Department of Transportation, design firms, precasters, contractors, researcher, and students will most benefit from this session.


11:00 AM - 1:00 PM

The ACI 370 and ACI 440F committees are jointly developing the standard "Blast Design Guidelines for Externally Bonded FRP Applications" to provide guidance for designing concrete and masonry wall panels with an application of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) that are subject to blast loading. The opening presentations in this two-part session will provide an overview of the proposed standard, while covering some basic blast design practices and introducing the underlying single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) analysis methodology. Subsequent presentations will discuss alternate slab analysis approaches, as well as FRPs used as column reinforcement, catching systems, and anchors within a blast and/or impact resistant design. Focused talks on FRP detailing and FRP manufacturer’s insights will also be presented. The attendees to this two-part session will: (1) Learn about the in-progress standard "Blast Design Guidelines for Externally Bonded FRP Applications" and its underlying methodologies. (2) Be introduced to basic blast design practices including dynamic effects, acceptable limit states, response criteria, and detailing requirements that may differ from those used in conventional slab and FRP design. (3) Become familiar with how various slab modeling approaches compare with available test data. (4) Be exposed to FRP blast and impact resistant applications for non-slab geometries such as columns, box sections, and catching systems.


11:00 AM - 1:00 PM


11:15 AM - 12:15 PM

Attendees at this session will become familiar with the state-of-the-art practices in North America and Europe for predicting formwork pressure and for measuring the actual pressures exerted on the forms during placing SCC concrete in vertical structural elements. (1) To become familiar with the current state-of-the-art documents in North America and Europe for predictive models to replicate the formwork pressures exerted on vertical structural concrete elements poured with SCC. (2) Understand and learn about the primary variables that contribute to the formwork pressure. (3) Become familiar with and learn about the sensors, data acquisition devices and installation parameters for measuring formwork pressure in the field. (4) Learn about the relationships between, structural build-up at rest, content and makeup of cementitious materials, chemical admixtures and aggregate properties that contribute to the formwork pressure models.


11:30 AM - 1:30 PM

$51.00


1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

$.00

Join ACI Committee 124 for a free walking tour of architectural concrete buildings led by Intermountain Chapter - ACI member Sarah Sutherland, Business Development Director of Forterra Structural & Specialty Products. The tour will last approximately 1 hour and will visit a variety of notable concrete buildings within easy walking distance of the convention venue. Plan on joining us to stretch your legs and see some of the beautiful concrete buildings that make Salt Lake City a great concrete town.


1:30 PM - 3:30 PM

Moderator: Van K Bui

Session Chair: Dr. Van Bui, Session Co-chairs: Dr. Charles Nmai & Prof. Surendra P. Shah
The requirements for achieving sufficient modulus of elasticity (MOE) of concrete is increasing not only for high rise structures, but also for concrete precast/prestressed components and repair application. However, achieving high modulus of elasticity, while maintaining good workability, pumpability and consolidation of concrete is of challenge for concrete producers and contractors. Key factors affecting MOE include mix design, rheological properties and construction practices also influence in-situ MOE and its homogeneity. Testing of MOE of high-performance concrete also requires special attentions to achieve reliable data. The session will be beneficial for engineers, specifiers, concrete producers, contractors and academic communities. Learning objectives for the session: (1) Why concrete modulus of elasticity is important in high-rise building designs. (2) Major factors influencing on concrete modulus of elasticity. (3) How to produce and test high modulus of elasticity. (4) Emerging technology to achieve high modulus of elasticity.


1:30 PM - 3:30 PM

Moderator: Charles E Pierce

This educational session will consist of two parts: (1) a presentation from the Walter P. Moore award recipient (30 min); and (2) a panel session on mentoring of students and young professors/professionals, to include undergraduate and graduate students, interns, post-doctoral researchers, and new hires in academia and industry (90 minutes). Attendees who are involved or interested in effective mentoring strategies are encouraged to join us for this engaging session.


1:30 PM - 3:30 PM

Moderator:

Introduce dramatic advancements in uses for pervious concrete for surface and ground water treatment. Attendees should (1) learn of research proving effective treatment of surface water and an extraordinary discovery that pervious concrete can treat contaminated ground water in superfund sites. Two other highly respected speakers will talk about advancements in pervious testing, (2) one introducing a new standard test method which will help researchers who are attempting to solve salt and deicer damage. (3) One covering the effectiveness of existing pervious testing standards. Research showing the mechanical advantages of using fiber in pervious concrete will share her results. (4) The final presentation will introduce both updated pervious training content for the NRMCA Pervious Training Manual, and a sample of a video series created to by the NPCPA that allows multi-language narration to help non-english speaking installers become certified.


4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

Moderator: Yail Jimmy Kim

The special sessions will emphasize recent advances in concrete bridges, including design, construction, and rehabilitation. Presentations will encompass a variety of technical aspects such as the innovative design methods of bridge structures, accelerated bridge construction, damage detection and assessment techniques, and strengthening of deteriorated bridge members. Both experimental and analytical investigations are of interest. The sessions bring to light recent research findings and provide an opportunity to discuss present challenges and technical demands. Critical information is given to those who lead tomorrow’s bridge design and construction, including practicing engineers, government officials, and academics. An ACI Special Publication will be published. (1) Learn the state-of-the-art of concrete bridges; (2) Identify research needs to advance the knowledge associated with concrete bridges; (3) Recognize the effort to establish a new trend in the design and construction of sustainable concrete bridges; (4) Link laboratory investigations with practical site applications.


4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

The technical session will discuss recently completed research and development efforts on topics related to precast and prestressed concrete structures. Presentations will focus on experimental and numerical studies which were conducted on the performance of precast building components and the resulting design recommendations and code changes which were developed. Topics include (1) recent advances in the design of spandrel beams, (2) hybrid frames, (3) fatigue performance of flange to flange connections, and (4) development of a new design methodology for seismic design of precast diaphragms. Attendees will learn the approaches used for the development of the guidelines and will be able to identify where to access the standards for use in design.


4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

The main objective of this session is to (1) provide an overview of methodologies for rating existing concrete bridge components including bridge deck, superstructure and substructure, using both LRFR and LFR approaches. Presentations will include (2) case studies of load rating concrete bridges with various structural configurations such as typical prestressed I-girders, reinforced and prestressed multi-cell box girder bridges, segmental concrete bridges, bridges with large horizontal curvatures and complex geometry (e.g. concrete arch and rigid frame bridges), and bridges with insufficient plans or details. Presentations will also (3) emphasize relevant refined analysis methods that extend beyond traditional AASHTO rating methods such as (4) finite element modeling, grillage modeling and diagnostic load testing.

This session will be of interest to bridge owners, operators, design engineers and researchers.


6:00 PM - 7:00 PM

$31.00

This reception is the final event of the Michael P. Collins Symposium on Structural Concrete in Shear, honoring Professor Michael Collins for his outstanding contributions in this field of knowledge. Collins is a structural engineer whose research concerns the basic shear-transfer mechanisms in reinforced concrete structures. His research has improved the safety of buildings, bridges, nuclear containment structures, and offshore oil platforms. Collins received his BE from the University of Canterbury in New Zealand in 1964 and his PhD from the University of New South Wales in Australia in 1968. He joined the University of Toronto in 1969, was appointed to the Bahen-Tanenbaum Chair in Civil Engineering in 1995, and was selected as a University Professor in 1999. Collins concentrated his research effort on understanding how cracked reinforced concrete resists shear stress. Shear failures can cause concrete structures to collapse without warning; hence, accurate analytical models for shear behavior are critical for public safety. The Compression Field Theory and subsequently the Modified Compression Field Theory, developed by Professor Collins and his colleagues at the University of Toronto, provide a rational basis for shear design and has received worldwide recognition. The Modified Compression Field Theory is currently the design standard in the Canadian Standard CAN/CSA A23.3-04, which is soon to be updated and included in the European Building Code. He is the author of over 80 technical papers, eight of which have received a research prize.


6:00 PM - 7:00 PM

All registered convention attendees are invited to attend the Women in ACI Reception. This long standing ACI tradition is a great opportunity to get to know other women in the concrete industry. In addition to networking, attendees of this reception will have the opportunity to participate in a silent auction. This auction will feature concrete artwork beautifully created by students and others. All are welcome at this reception! A cash bar and light hors d’oeuvres will be served.


6:30 PM - 8:30 PM

Moderators: Jan Vosahlik, Jacob Henschen