Sessions and Events

Sessions & Events 

 

Convention Highlights

October 17, 2018


6:00 AM - 6:45 AM

Interested in putting a little balance into your hectic week? Whether you have regularly practiced yoga or have never tried it, this session will help you get your body and mind grounded for the day and week ahead. Led by yoga teacher Kimberly Kayler, this intro to yoga class requires no experience. You don't have to be able to twist into a pretzel or even touch your toes! Registration is not required and yoga mats will be provided.

*Please consult with your physician to determine if you are fit for this type of activity.


7:00 AM - 6:00 PM

The 45-minute installation examination is closed-book and consists of approximately 45 multiple-choice questions. To pass the installation examination, the examinee must attain a minimum score of 74%. The 75-minute inspection examination is open-book and consists of approximately 55 multiple choice questions. To pass the installation examination, the examinee must attain a minimum score of 70%.


7:00 AM - 6:00 PM

The 3 hour written inspection examination is open book and consists of approximately 80 multiple choice questions. The 1 hour plans reading examination consists of approximately 20 questions and is designed to test the examinee’s ability to read and understand engineering drawings. The minimum passing grade for each examination is 70%.


7:00 AM - 6:00 PM

The 3 hour written inspection examination is open book and consists of approximately 80 multiple choice questions. The 1 hour plans reading examination consists of approximately 20 questions and is designed to test the examinee’s ability to read and understand engineering drawings. The minimum passing grade for each examination is 70%.


7:00 AM - 6:00 PM

The 4-hour written examination is open-book and consists of approximately 100 multiple-choice questions. To pass the written examination, BOTH of the following conditions must be met:
1. At least 60% correct for each of the required test methods and practices; and
2. A minimum score of 70% overall.
The 2-hour practical application examination is open-book and consists of approximately 25 multiple-choice questions. The minimum passing grade for the examination is 70%.


8:30 AM - 10:30 AM

Moderators: Mohamed ElBatanouny, Marwa Abdelrahman

The objective of this session is to present and discuss different approaches to analyze and reduce data from structural health monitoring systems especially in field settings. The focus is how to translate SHM data into useful information that can be used by engineers and owners to: (1) understand the current condition of the monitored structure, (2) prediction of remaining service life and damage prognosis, and (3) maintenance scheduling and prioritization, if applicable. Understand how SHM technologies can be used to monitor reinforced and prestressed concrete structures and elements under field as well as laboratory conditions.
Learning Objectives:
(1) Review analysis and interpretation techniques for SHM data.
(2) Identify the challenges related to the management of ‘big data’ associated with SHM.
(3) Describe the relationship between collected data and how it can be used to assess the condition of
the monitored structure.
(4) Summarize ongoing research and future developments in SHM technologies for monitoring reinforced and prestressed concrete structures.

This session has been AIA and ICC approved for 2 CEU/PDH credits.


8:30 AM - 10:30 AM

Moderators: Tracy D Marcotte, Kyle D Stanish

The inaugural concrete repair specifications have arrived, and immediately one wonders, “What makes concrete repair specifications different from new concrete specifications?”. Attendees will learn implications for architects and engineers when specifying concrete repair, and special requirements for bracing and shoring, surface preparation, and the use of proprietary materials. At last, repair specifiers have a foundation document on which they can rely for a wide range of projects, from small repair projects to large building-wide rehabilitation work.
Learning Objectives:
(1) Specify acceptance criteria and explain what criteria are useful;
(2) State the importance of tailoring your concrete repair specifications to fit the project;
(3) Identify the differences between specifying conventional vs proprietary repair materials;
(4) Describe how ACI 301 and ACI 562 specifications differ and how to use them to specify a repair.

This session has been AIA and ICC approved for 2 CEU/PDH credits.


11:00 AM - 1:00 PM

Moderators: Mohamed A Mahgoub, Ahmed Ibrahim

Concrete is the world’s most widely used construction material. Yet, the production of portland cement, an essential constituent of concrete, leads to greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. The production of 1 ton of portland cement clinker releases approximately one ton of CO2 and other greenhouse gases. Environmental considerations have been a major thrust for the sustainable development of the cement and concrete industries. A sustainable concrete structure is designed and built to have a positive environmental footprint during its entire life cycle. Concrete is increasingly being considered as a sustainable material owing to its low inherent energy requirements and little associated waste. Not only is it made from some of the most plentiful resources on Earth, it can also be made with numerous recycled materials and by products and is itself entirely recyclable. Emerging breakthroughs in concrete technology have allowed producing ultra high-performance concrete requiring less raw materials, along with structures that are much more durable to reduce maintenance, repair, and reconstruction.
Learning Objectives:
(1) Demonstrate how to evaluate concrete mixtures with various waste-by-product and recycled materials;
(2) Recognize many different types of testing that could be performed on new concrete mixtures produced with recycled materials;
(3) Explain the various methods to design and validate the concrete produced by new recycled materials;
(4) Specify emerging technologies in the concrete produced by recycled materials and its application in civil infrastructures.

This session has been AIA and ICC approved for 2 CEU/PDH credits.


11:00 AM - 1:00 PM

Moderators: Liberato Ferrara, Nemkumar Banthia

While fiber-reinforced concrete is gaining increasing popularity in several building and infrastructural applications, also thanks to the availability of design rules in international codes (including ACI 544 reports), new exciting emerging technologies and applications are arising which push ahead the boundaries of knowledge and engineering practice. These range from the use of functionalized micro and nano scale constituents, providing tailored performance such as self healing, self curing, self sensing abilities; to new types of fibers, in case obtained by recycling by products of other industrial activities; to new testing concepts and methodologies, such as coupling mechanical and durability related issues; to high end applications which go from challenging use of FRC for taller and more efficient wind towers and off shore structures; to additive manufacturing/3-D printing applications.
Learning Objectives:
(1) Report on cutting edge technologies and applications in FRC at the frontier of the knowledge and practice;
(2) Discuss concepts and technologies to design cement-based materials with tailored one-of-a-kind functionalities, according to a "metamaterial" logical framework;
(3) Compare innovations in fiber reinforced concrete to enhance broad applications;
(4) Recognize the importance of sustainable construction materials for global infrastructure.

This session has been AIA and ICC approved for 2 CEU/PDH credits.


11:00 AM - 1:00 PM

Moderators: Sergio F Brena, Nancy Larson Varney

This session will present the latest advances in seismic rehabilitation of existing concrete buildings that have come out of recent research projects and experiences from recent earthquakes around the world. The session will present results of evaluation studies applied to existing structures using current ASCE 41, ACI 369.1R-17, or other local seismic evaluation and retrofit standards. Attendees will also be presented with information on recent research results of laboratory experiments of retrofitted structural components. An overview of ongoing activities within ACI 369 to update the ACI 369.1-17 Standard will also be presented.
Learning Objectives:
(1) Conduct nonlinear modeling of new and existing concrete buildings for seismic evaluation;
(2) Apply ASCE 41 and other evaluation and retrofit standards to building case studies;
(3) Summarize performance of retrofitted reinforced concrete components such as column, joints and walls;
(4) Discuss upcoming updates of the ACI 369.1-17 standard, which is used as the main resource for the concrete chapter of ASCE 41.

This session has been AIA and ICC approved for 2 CEU/PDH credits.


1:30 PM - 3:30 PM

Moderators: Mohamed A Mahgoub, Yasser A Khodair

Concrete is the world’s most widely used construction material. Yet, the production of portland cement, an essential constituent of concrete, leads to greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. The production of 1 ton of portland cement clinker releases approximately one ton of CO2 and other greenhouse gases. Environmental considerations have been a major thrust for the sustainable development of the cement and concrete industries. A sustainable concrete structure is designed and built to have a positive environmental footprint during its entire life cycle. Concrete is increasingly being considered as a sustainable material owing to its low inherent energy requirements and little associated waste. Not only is it made from some of the most plentiful resources on Earth, it can also be made with numerous recycled materials and by products and is itself entirely recyclable. Emerging breakthroughs in concrete technology have allowed producing ultra high-performance concrete requiring less raw materials, along with structures that are much more durable to reduce maintenance, repair, and reconstruction.
Learning Objectives:
(1) Compare design parameters for recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) columns and natural aggregate concrete (NAC) columns.
(2) Review the compressive strength test results for concrete mixtures and understand that the compressive strength depended mainly on the calcium content of the fly ash and curing regime.
(3) Discuss numerical simulation and statistical sensitivity results that are analyzed to understand (1) stress development in RAC systems, (2) the relative influence that adhered mortar content and constituents stiffnesses have on RAC system performance, and (3) variability in expected mechanical properties of RAC systems.
(4) Compare the environmental impacts of using either natural or recycled aggregates in structural concrete.

This session has been AIA and ICC approved for 2 CEU/PDH credits.


1:30 PM - 3:30 PM

Moderators: Liberato Ferrara, Nemkumar Banthia

While fiber-reinforced concrete is gaining increasing popularity in several building and infrastructural applications, also thanks to the availability of design rules in international codes (including ACI 544 reports), new exciting emerging technologies and applications are arising which push ahead the boundaries of knowledge and engineering practice. These range from the use of functionalized micro and nano scale constituents, providing tailored performance such as self healing, self curing, self sensing abilities; to new types of fibers, in case obtained by recycling by products of other industrial activities; to new testing concepts and methodologies, such as coupling mechanical and durability related issues; to high end applications which go from challenging use of FRC for taller and more efficient wind towers and off shore structures; to additive manufacturing/3-D printing applications.
Learning Objectives:
(1) Discuss long term behavior, aging and creep, of fiber reinforced concrete.
(2) Illustrate the advantages of a precast tunnel segment solution when subjected to internal explosions.
(3) Demonstrate the improved strengthening performance of an eco-friendly ductile cementitious composite (EDCC).
(4) Devise concrete mixtures for improved durability and long-term performance under extremely aggressive exposures.

This session has been AIA and ICC approved for 2 CEU/PDH credits.


1:30 PM - 3:30 PM

Moderators: Sergio F Brena, Nancy Larson Varney

This session will present the latest advances in seismic rehabilitation of existing concrete buildings that have come out of recent research projects and experiences from recent earthquakes around the world. The session will present results of evaluation studies applied to existing structures using current ASCE 41, ACI 369.1R-17, or other local seismic evaluation and retrofit standards. Attendees will also be presented with information on recent research results of laboratory experiments of retrofitted structural components. An overview of ongoing activities within ACI 369 to update the ACI 369.1-17 Standard will also be presented.
Learning Objectives:
(1) Assess the residual capacity of plastic hinges to make informed decisions about the future usability of damaged buildings.
(2) Review data from a seismic response study on FRP strengthening.
(3) Appraise residual capacity and repairability of earthquake-damaged concrete buildings.
(4) Quantify the benefits of using seismic retrofit gravity columns.

This session has been AIA and ICC approved for 2 CEU/PDH credits.


6:30 PM - 8:00 PM

ACI President David Lange invites all convention attendees to the President’s Reception, where you’ll have the opportunity to network with committee Chairs, chapter Presidents, and international attendees. An assortment of food and beverages will be available.



Upper Level Sponsors

ACI Las Vegas Chapter
Baker
BASF
Euclid Chemical
FiberForce
GCP
WJE